Graham Ross’s picture

By: Graham Ross

Why doesn’t machine translation (MT) work for all languages? There are currently more than 7,000 languages worldwide. If each of those had four dialects, that would be more than 28,000 language variances. To offer a perspective, Google can translate 37 languages. If you take into account integrating artificial intelligence (AI) into each of the 7,000+ languages for MT, we are a long way from being able to translate 100 percent by machine, if ever.

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

You run a manufacturing business, so you know how it goes. The cost of doing business and manufacturing product never decreases; it always grows. Merely maintaining your revenue status quo will only ensure you get your lunch eaten by inflation. If you aren’t growing your profits, you aren’t just standing still—you’re going backward. Here are three ways investing in technology can help your business grow and increase profit margins.

Taran March @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Taran March @ Quality Digest

One thing you can say about that critical commodity called steel: It gets around. Ancient ironware excavated in what is now Turkey has been dated to 1800 B.C. Some 1,200 years later, blacksmiths in Sri Lanka employed furnaces driven by monsoon winds to produce a high-carbon steel. The Tamils of southern India enjoyed a lucrative steel trade with the likes of Alexander the Great.

Tonianne DeMaria’s picture

By: Tonianne DeMaria

While heading to a session at the most recent Lean Transformation Summit, I found myself confronted with signage that posed the following open-ended question: “All problem solvers must....”

Given how the work we do at Modus Cooperandi focuses largely on the nexus between lean for knowledge work, behavioral economics, neuroscience, and the teachings of W. Edwards Deming, one response in particular resonated:

Mary McAtee’s picture

By: Mary McAtee

True to my profession as an engineer, I am a total geek at heart and proud of it. Spending time in automobile museums always fascinates me. It excites me to see a prescient innovator from the past come up with an idea like headlights. The first ones were Limelight carbide models that had a nasty habit of setting the horseless carriage on fire. Within a couple of generations there were sealed beam electric headlights, safe, effective, and increasingly affordable.

Beth Colbert’s picture

By: Beth Colbert

When we think of champions of manufacturing today, we tend to think of some of the big companies such as Boeing, Caterpillar, Hewlett-Packard, and IBM. But companies don’t form themselves, and patents don’t automatically mean innovation—people do.

Not all companies have inventors. However, all companies can, and probably do, have innovators.

Multiple Authors
By: Thomas Kochan, Lee Dyer

The technologies driving artificial intelligence (AI) are expanding exponentially, leading many technology experts and futurists to predict that machines will soon be doing many of the jobs that humans do today. Some even predict humans could lose control over their future.

Austin Thomas’s picture

By: Austin Thomas

Since commercially available 3D printers came out a few years ago, their capabilities have radically expanded. At first, they could only print little things out of plastic, but now people have begun to print working cars and even bridges. People are actively experimenting with how to print with more materials like metals and, more recently, concrete.

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