Mike Richman’s picture

By: Mike Richman

During this past Friday’s episode of QDL, we presented two great interviews, both revolving around standards and certification, plus a piece about analytics, and a lively off-script about the responsibilities of media companies like Facebook when it comes to protecting user data. Here’s a closer look at what we discussed:

Georgia Tech News Center’s picture

By: Georgia Tech News Center

It’s small enough to fit inside a shoebox, yet this robot on four wheels has a big mission: keeping factories and other large facilities safe from hackers.

Meet the HoneyBot. Developed by a team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, the diminutive device is designed to lure in digital troublemakers who have set their sights on industrial facilities. HoneyBot will then trick the bad actors into giving up valuable information to cybersecurity professionals.

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

A decade before an iceberg shattered the hull plates of the Titanic and half a century before a plague of brittle fractures started sinking Liberty ships during World War II, scientists in the United States and France had devised a novel, and strikingly simple, method for measuring the way metal reacts to impact.

Dan Jacob’s picture

By: Dan Jacob

Developing profitable, timely, high-quality products is more important today than ever before. Visibility of in-use product performance has never been higher, while competitive pressures continue to squeeze margins and time to market.

Tim Mouw’s picture

By: Tim Mouw

To control color, you need to be able to compare very small differences, determine their impact and understand how to address that impact. In this series we’ve already looked at the history of color analysis and the role of light in tolerancing. Here we’ll discuss the difference between a color space and a color tolerance, and introduce the most common methods.

Minitab Inc.’s picture

By: Minitab Inc.

Anticipating challenges is always a daunting task for continuous improvement professionals. Unforeseen inefficiencies in process or defects in product development can throw timelines and associated costs into disarray. How to commit to realistic forecasts and timelines when resources are limited, or gathering real data is too expensive or impractical? Can simulated data be trusted for accurate predictions? That’s when Monte Carlo simulation comes in.

Naphtali Hoff’s picture

By: Naphtali Hoff

It happens to all of us, and often at the most inopportune times. We know that we have work to do—a job to complete, a new project to launch, some loose ends to tie up—but we just feel stuck in place. As if everything that we try doesn’t work. We take two steps forward and one or more steps b ack. Or we start something and simply stop. Or, worse yet, we don’t even know where to start.

Why does this happen?

William A. Levinson’s picture

By: William A. Levinson

Inspection is a mandatory but nonvalue-adding activity, and our objective is to do as little as possible, provided that we continue to fulfill the customer’s requirements. The zero acceptance number (c = 0) sampling plan requires far less inspection than the corresponding ANSI/ASQ Z1.4 (formerly MIL-STD 105) plan, and becomes viable when the supplier is extremely confident in its level of quality.1

Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest


In our March 30, 2018, episode of QDL, we discuss the gig economy, metrology training, and psychobabble (you know who I mean).

“Are You (and Your Company) Ready for the Gig Economy?”

More and more employees are joining the gig economy. What does that mean for your company?

Kyle Rose’s picture

By: Kyle Rose

As I’m sure many of you know, the ISO 13485 standard for medical devices was updated in 2016, which means the time to transition your quality management system (QMS) is now. Most auditing organizations have either cut off ISO 13485:2003 recertifications or will be doing so very soon.

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