Kemper Lewis’s picture

By: Kemper Lewis

President Trump has long talked about reinvigorating U.S. manufacturing, which has suffered heavy job losses as a result of automation, trade deals, and other factors. In July, the Trump administration even celebrated “made in America” week by showcasing things built in the United States and hosting dozens of manufacturers at the White House.

Eric Stoop’s picture

By: Eric Stoop

General Motors (GM) recently published updated customer-specific requirements for IATF 16949 compliance. The new requirements take effect Nov. 1, 2017, and cover layered process audit (LPA) requirements in greater depth than previous versions.

Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest


Our Oct. 27, 2017, episode of QDL looked at Ford, autonomous cars, and changes to FDA compassionate use rules.

“Ford Plans $14B in Cost Cuts as Part of New CEO’s Strategy”

Christopher Martin’s picture

By: Christopher Martin

Lily Elefteriadou’s picture

By: Lily Elefteriadou

What self-driving cars want, and what people want from them, varies widely. Often these desires are at odds with each other. For instance, carmakers—and the designers of the software that will run autonomous vehicles—know that it’s safest if cars stay far away from each other. But traffic engineers know that if every car operated to ensure lots of surrounding space, local roads and highways alike would be clogged for miles, and nobody would get anywhere.

Jun Nakamuro’s picture

By: Jun Nakamuro

The world first became aware of the Toyota Production System (TPS) when Taiichi Ohno published a book about his groundbreaking efforts at Toyota. It was published in Japan in 1978. The Japanese version of his book wasn’t translated into English until 1988. Because 10 years had passed, this translation did not fully communicate the nuances of Ohno’s vision. The direct translation into English does not communicate the depth hidden within Ohno’s choice of words.

Multiple Authors
By: Sheronda Jeffries, Carmine Reda

Companies purchase lots of things. They purchase tangible goods, like raw materials and equipment, or intangible services, like calibration and transportation. And most companies have basic criteria that they use to qualify and select suppliers.

Douglas C. Fair’s picture

By: Douglas C. Fair

It’s not enough to collect the right data, ensure all your quality checks are done correctly and on time, and prioritize your quality improvement opportunities. You also need to be able to take advantage of those opportunities.

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