Jennifer V. Miller’s picture

By: Jennifer V. Miller

Is your organization built on a culture of trust?

Look around you; there are plenty of clues as to whether trust abounds. How quickly are decisions made? How many people do you copy (or worse, bcc) on emails? Do executives check in on the “troops” even when on vacation?

Given that 82 percent of workers don’t trust their boss, trust is a scarce resource in many organizations.

Nicole Radziwill’s picture

By: Nicole Radziwill

ISO 31000 defines risk as “the effect of uncertainty on outcomes.” Identifying risks and determining ways to respond to them help you learn about your processes, your organization, and the environment you’re operating within. It also raises your awareness of how any of these things might change in the future. Perhaps most important, this helps you quickly respond to—and recover from—negative events like natural disasters, supply chain disruptions, and cyberattacks.

Rob Matheson’s picture

By: Rob Matheson

MIT researchers have developed novel photography optics that capture images based on the timing of reflecting light inside the optics, instead of the traditional approach that relies on the arrangement of optical components. These new principles, the researchers say, open doors to new capabilities for time- or depth-sensitive cameras, which are not possible with conventional photography optics.

Oscar Combs’s picture

By: Oscar Combs

ISO 9001:2015, clause 6.1 requires an organization to identify its risks and take actions to address identified risks. It is very tempting to start with a huge list of potential risks for the organization, but is the organization focusing on the actual risks that have an effect on its operations? To perform an effective risk assessment, an organization must first identify the uncertainty in its processes.

Ruth P. Stevens’s picture

By: Ruth P. Stevens

Lead generation is a major preoccupation of the typical B2B marketing department. Indeed, most B2B marketers report that leads—with an emphasis on quality leads—are their primary goal. So, let’s review the top prospecting tools and techniques that are working for B2B marketers today. And if you have any that I’ve missed, please chime in.

Richard Wilkinson’s picture

By: Richard Wilkinson

Whether it’s the effort to redefine the kilogram or researching the Harry Potter realm of quantum mechanics where things can somehow be in two or more places at one time, quite a bit of the science carried out at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) can be hard for the average person on the street to understand or relate to.

Katie Takacs’s picture

By: Katie Takacs

As a consumer, it’s nearly impossible to get away from videos, advertising or otherwise. To give you a numeric sense of our collective obsession with online moving images: Since last year, YouTube has started registering more than a billion hours of video viewing every single day.

Mark Rosenthal’s picture

By: Mark Rosenthal

During a TED talk, Amy Edmondson, the Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management at Harvard Business School, talks about “How to turn a group of strangers into a team.” Although long-standing teams are able to perform, our workplaces today require ad-hoc collaboration between diverse groups. The question is: What kind of leadership, and what kind of structure, contribute to working together on the problem?

Michael Jarrett’s picture

By: Michael Jarrett

Transformational leaders are the exception, not the rule.

A consistent picture emerges from lists of top CEOs. In Harvard Business Review’s Best-Performing CEOs ranking, Pablo Isla of Inditex, the parent company of Zara; Ajay Banga of Mastercard; and Bernard Arnault of LVMH stand out for both performance and longevity. Between the three of them, these CEOs have served for 50 years marked by strong performance.

Willie Davis’s picture

By: Willie Davis

Congratulations: You’re new to your organization, and the obligatory “meet and greets” are complete. You have met your team, your supervisor has conveyed expectations, your office is organized and—most important—you now know how to get to and from the coffee machine. The euphoria of getting the new job is over; now, what do you do?

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