Anthony Chirico’s picture

By: Anthony Chirico

Everybody wants to design and conduct a great experiment! To find enlightenment by the discovery of the big red X and perhaps a few smaller pink x’s along the way. Thoughtful selection of the best experiment factors, the right levels, the most efficient design, the best plan for randomization, and creative ways to quantify the response variable consume our thoughts and imagination. The list of considerations and trade-offs is quite impressive.

Scott A. Hindle’s picture

By: Scott A. Hindle

Walter Shewhart, father of statistical process control and creator of the control chart, put a premium on the time order sequence of data. Since many statistics and graphs are unaffected by this, you might wonder what the fuss is about. Read on to see why.

Eric Stoop’s picture

By: Eric Stoop

The frequently referenced learning pyramid asserts than an average student retains 75 percent of information learned through practice, compared to just 5 percent of what he hears in a lecture. Although experts may dispute the relevance of these figures when applied to modern society, all of us can agree that we learn and retain more by doing than by being told in a classroom.

Minitab Inc.’s picture

By: Minitab Inc.

Process validation is vital to the success of companies that manufacture pharmaceutical drugs, vaccines, test kits, and a variety of other biological products for people and animals. According to FDA guidelines, process validation is “the collection and evaluation of data, from the process design state through commercial production, which establishes scientific evidence that a process is capable of consistently delivering a quality product.”

Anthony Chirico’s picture

By: Anthony Chirico

Perhaps the reader recognizes d2 as slang for “designated driver,” but quality professionals will recognize it as a control chart constant used to estimate short-term variation of a process. The basic formula shown below is widely used in control charting for estimating the short-term variation using the average range of small samples. But what exactly is d2 and why should we care?

Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

In this episode we look at a history of quality, how you serve your customer in the housing industry, and what makes a good review.

“Young couples ‘trapped in car dependency’”

Building entry-level housing along highways may give couples the chance to buy a home, but at what cost to them and the environment?

Gary Bell’s picture

By: Gary Bell

It is all too common in the industry: A part design is created and sent out for production only to hit repeated snags as questions arise about datums, locators, symbols, and values. Even simple misunderstandings, such as where the geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T) lines terminate, have resulted in serious delays (in some cases, of more than a month) and nonconformance issues, which resulted in wasted products.1

Anthony Chirico’s picture

By: Anthony Chirico

In my first article, the merits and cautions of AS9138 c=0 sampling plans were discussed and a simple formula was provided to determine the required sample size to detect nonconforming units.

Anthony Chirico’s picture

By: Anthony Chirico

In my previous article, I discussed the merits and cautions of the “acceptance number” equal zero (c=0) sampling plans contained within AS9138. A simple formula was provided to determine appropriate sample size, and it was illustrated that twice the inspection does not provide twice the consumer protection.

Anthony Chirico’s picture

By: Anthony Chirico

Aerospace standard AS9138—“Quality management systems statistical product acceptance requirements” was issued this year (2018), a few years after its accompanying guidance materials in section 3.7 of the International Aerospace Quality Group’s (IAQG) Supply Chain Management Handbook.

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