Mike Richman’s picture

By: Mike Richman

During the Nov. 3, 2017, episode of QDL, we (figuratively) traveled the globe to bring you quality information. Let’s take a closer look:

Multiple Authors
By: Scott A. Hindle, Donald J. Wheeler

In theory, a production process is always predictable. In practice, however, predictable operation is an achievement that has to be sustained, which is easier said than done. Predictable operation means that the process is doing the best that it can currently do—that it is operating with maximum consistency. Maintaining this level of process performance over the long haul can be a challenge. Effective ways of meeting this challenge are discussed below.

Matthew Barsalou’s picture

By: Matthew Barsalou

Quality tools can serve many purposes in problem solving. They may be used to assist in decision making, selecting quality improvement projects, and in performing root cause analysis. They provide useful structure to brainstorming sessions, for communicating information, and for sharing ideas with a team. They also help with identifying the optimal option when more than one potential solution is available. Quality tools can also provide assistance in managing a problem-solving or quality improvement project.

John Flaig’s picture

By: John Flaig

Story update 9/26/2017: The words "distribution of" were inadvertently left out of the last sentence of the second paragraph.

Some practitioners think that if data from a process have a “bell-shaped” histogram, then the system is experiencing only common cause variation (i.e., random variation). This is incorrect and reflects a fundamental misunderstanding about the relationship between distribution shape and the variation in a system. However, even knowledgeable people sometime make this mistake.

Mike Richman’s picture

By: Mike Richman

QDL from Fri., Sept. 15, 2017, demonstrated that everywhere you look, you’ll find the positive effect of better quality. Here’s what we chatted about:

“U.S. Business Sectors Gain or Hold Steady in Public Esteem”

Anthony D. Burns’s picture

By: Anthony D. Burns

I had humble, that is, poor, beginnings. I didn’t even know the taste of real ice cream until later in life. One of the first impacts I felt of the luxury that technology brings was the diode my father bought for me to replace the cat’s whisker on my crystal radio. My high school was lovingly called “shack town.” I spoke as much English as a European refugee, because I had a stammer worse that King George VI.

Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest


Our August 11, 2017, episode of QDL looked at the role of technology in after-market service, stairs that help you up, Fidget Cubes, and more.

“Climbing Stairs Just Got Easier With Energy-Recycling Steps”

These stairs actually help you go up.

Mike Richman’s picture

By: Mike Richman

The June 30, 2017, episode of QDL offered a wrinkle in time, of sorts: not only orbiting debris and medieval medicine, but moments in the here and now such as our interview with Keith Bevan of the Coordinate Metrology Society and the UK’s National Physical Laboratory, and an on-the-go version of the Ohno Circle. Here’s a closer look:

Douglas C. Fair’s picture

By: Douglas C. Fair

Plant-floor quality issues tend to focus on a company’s technical resources. When products fall out of spec, alarms sound and all hands are immediately on deck to fix things. Despite large technology investments to monitor and adjust production processes, manufacturers are still bedeviled by quality problems. The issue is not a lack of technology. It is a lack of quality intelligence.

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