Scott Berkun’s picture

By: Scott Berkun

The great surprise for people with good ideas is the gap between how an idea feels in their minds and how it feels when they try to put the idea to work.

Craig Cochran’s picture

By: Craig Cochran

War heroes are a special category of leaders. They embody bravery, resoluteness, and strength—quintessential attributes of good leaders. This is exactly the sort of leader Shakespeare gives us at the beginning of Macbeth.

At the start of Act 1, Macbeth, a Scottish nobleman and field general, has just defeated a rebellion, with Macbeth himself slaying one of the rebels and putting his head on a pike. Nobody can say enough about Macbeth and his virtues. The King of Scotland, Duncan, gushes like a schoolgirl:

Bruce Bolger’s picture

By: Bruce Bolger

Grace Swanson, vice president of human capital at Accumold, a leading micro-molding plastics injection company located just outside Des Moines, Iowa, knows the field of standards well. Her company has certifications in ISO 9001 for quality management, ISO 14001 for environmental management, and ISO 13485 for medical devices.

Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest


In our April 13, 2018, episode of QDL, we talked about anti-hacker robots, data privacy, and new product introduction.

“HoneyBot Lures in Digital Troublemakers”

MIT nerds come up with a tasty target for IoT hackers. But this one fights back.

Marin Hedin’s picture

By: Marin Hedin

Limiting first-year medical residents to 16-hour work shifts, compared to “flexing” them to allow for some longer shifts, generally makes residents more satisfied with their training and work-life balance. It also makes their training directors more dissatisfied with curtailed educational opportunities, a new study from the New England Journal of Medicine has found.

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

You can’t see well without lenses that can focus, whether those lenses are in your eye or the microscope you peer through. An innovative way to focus beams of neutrons might allow scientists to probe the interiors of opaque objects at a size range they were blind to previously, allowing them to explore the innards of objects from meteorites to cutting-edge manufactured materials without damaging them.

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

Invented in 1987 and commercially available since 1991, laser trackers have long been a mainstay of the aerospace industry. Automotive manufacturers have also adopted laser trackers for quality control (QC) and design. The fact is, any industry dealing with large-scale measurements—from small machine shops to medium-sized enterprises to major Tier 1 automotive and aerospace suppliers—all share the potential to realize tremendous benefits by adopting laser tracker technology.

Jack Dunigan’s picture

By: Jack Dunigan

This is the next secret in our series, “The Secrets to Success You Don’t Know That You Already Know ” at The Practical Leader. Here we’re going to talk about Secret No. 4: Don’t Set Goals.

Shawn Faircloth’s picture

By: Shawn Faircloth

The cost of ineffective corrective action can be astronomical when you consider the monetary and reputational impact of delayed problem-solving. On a small scale, repeat problems—even minor errors—send a message to customers that you just don’t care to get it right.

And when poor problem-solving leads to more significant quality escapes? You could be looking at $10,000 per minute in line-stoppage charges from the customer, or even a $10 million recall.

Knowledge at Wharton’s picture

By: Knowledge at Wharton

America’s healthcare system has been on the examining table lately: from the tortuous battle over the Affordable Care Act, to Senator Bernie Sanders’ bill to allow low-cost prescription drugs in from Canada, to the intriguing announcement in January that Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JPMorgan Chase would create an independent healthcare company for their employees.

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