NETL’s picture

By: NETL

Contrary to that old cooking adage, “a watched pot never boils,” keeping a careful eye on things—in the kitchen or in the laboratory—can be essential to making a useable (or edible) final product.

Intertek’s picture

By: Intertek

Sponsored Content

As widely useful and broadly applicable as it may be, the ISO 9001 standard covering general requirements for quality management systems (QMS) cannot address all stakeholder needs in every sector. Component functions and operations of discrete industries often require additional standards to ensure that sector-specific procedures are undertaken and completed in a standardized and generally accepted manner.

Intertek’s picture

By: Intertek

Sponsored Content

For organizations within the aerospace sector, certification to the AS9100 family of standards—including AS9110 for aerospace maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) organizations; and AS9120 for aerospace warehouse and distribution operations—is a necessity for doing business. However, it’s also an opportunity to strengthen the inherent quality of the products and services that these companies offer to their customers.

Intertek’s picture

By: Intertek

Sponsored Content

Organizations that build, supply, design, or maintain products, parts, or services for the aerospace industry generally must be certified to the AS9100 family of standards (including AS9110, which is specifically for aerospace maintenance, repair, and overhaul [MRO] organizations; and AS9120, for aerospace warehouse and distribution operations). AS9100 Revision D is the latest version of this sector-specific standard.

Douglas C. Fair’s picture

By: Douglas C. Fair

Plant-floor quality issues tend to focus on a company’s technical resources. When products fall out of spec, alarms sound and all hands are immediately on deck to fix things. Despite large technology investments to monitor and adjust production processes, manufacturers are still bedeviled by quality problems. The issue is not a lack of technology. It is a lack of quality intelligence.

Multiple Authors
By: Mark Lee Hunter, Luk Van Wassenhove, Maria Besiou

Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

I n our June 23, 2017, episode of QDL we look at STEM education, personal kanban, and common mistakes when using SPC.

“ASME Supports STEM Opportunities Act of 2017”

Michael Ray Fincher’s picture

By: Michael Ray Fincher

To meet the 2018 deadline for becoming certified to ISO 9001:2015, organizations are scrambling to overhaul their quality management systems. One major revision to ISO 9001 is the requirement to identify, evaluate, and address risks. Unfortunately, a tool most appropriate for these actions has fallen to the wayside. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is the perfect tool to satisfy an organization’s risk analysis needs—provided that the technique is understood.

Robert A. Brown’s picture

By: Robert A. Brown

Lean thinking has taken its rightful place in the effort to improve efficiency in manufacturing. However, it isn’t fulfilling its potential in many areas, most notably with knowledge workers. This is due to a fundamental flaw in how lean is presented and utilized. With a better constructed approach, lean can be of value in nonproduction environments, including improving the efficiency and effectiveness of how people interact—a true boon to every business. For lean thinking, one size does not fit all.

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