Content by Fred Schenkelberg

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Fred Schenkelberg
When products were crafted one at a time, the design and manufacturing processes were often done by the same person. For example, a craftsman would design and build a chest of drawers or a carriage...
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Fred Schenkelberg
What if all failures occurred truly randomly? Well, for one thing the math would be easier. The exponential distribution would be the only time to failure distribution—we wouldn’t need Weibull or...
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Fred Schenkelberg
Concurrent engineering is a common approach that pairs developing the product design and its supporting manufacturing processes through the development process. There are several reasons why this...
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Fred Schenkelberg
The planning of environmental or reliability testing becomes a question of sample size at some point. It’s probably the most common question I hear as a reliability engineer: How many samples do we...
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Fred Schenkelberg
Why do so many avoid confronting the reality of failure? In plant asset management, we are surrounded by people who steadfastly don’t want to know about nor talk about failures. Yet failure...
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Fred Schenkelberg
Just, please, plot the data if you have gathered some time-to-failure data, or you have the breakdown dates for a piece of equipment. Any data really. It could be your review of your car...
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Fred Schenkelberg
What happens when a product lasts too long? How long is good enough? Every product is different, and our ability to define what’s “long enough” is fraught with uncertainty. If it wears out...
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Fred Schenkelberg
Control charts provide an ongoing statistical test to determine if a recent reading or set of readings represents convincing evidence that a process has changed from an established stable...