Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

Located in Butler, Wisconsin, Accurate Pattern has specialized in wood, metal, and plastic patterns, tools, fixtures, gauges, prototypes, and models since 1985. Technologies and services include CAD design, manual and CNC machining, wood and metalworking, painting and welding, plastic fabrication, and form services such as design, engineering, and production job shops.

Originally known as Accurate Pattern & Model Inc., the company was founded by brothers Bruce and Brian Williams in February 1985. Accurate Pattern supplied its first customers with precision patterns for urethane-molded parts. In 1986, the company was incorporated, and Bruce became president. In November 2007, Accurate Pattern moved to its current location, a plant featuring 19,000 sq ft of shop and office space and 5,000 sq ft of mezzanine. Bruce has used Exact Metrology products throughout the years to ensure accurate, reliable results.

Bruce met Dean Solberg, Exact Metrology co-president, when he was looking to buy an Elm CMM/layout machine with PC-DMIS software. Solberg was in contact with a sales representative at Elm Systems and helped Accurate Pattern by setting them up with the right machine, configuration, and software.

Optical Gaging Products OGP’s picture

By: Optical Gaging Products OGP

The RGM Watch Co. was founded by American watchmaker Roland G. Murphy. His career and interest in horology (the art or science of timekeeping devices) began as a teenager while working part-time for a clock company. Later, he enrolled in the Bowman Technical School of Watchmaking, and in 1986, Murphy was accepted into WOSTEP (Watchmakers of Switzerland Training and Educational Program).

After finishing WOSTEP, he worked in product development for the Hamilton Watch Co. until he founded the RGM Watch Co. in 1992.


Roland G. Murphy

RGM Watch sales are conducted on a personal, one-to-one basis. Customers who visit the company are often greeted by Murphy himself, who openly shares his passion for classic watch design, innovation, and craftsmanship as he discusses the custom design features that are often requested. RGM employs a team of 11 people and produces “a few hundred” watches a year, priced from $3,500 to $95,000, depending on design and material.

John Toon’s picture

By: John Toon

Using X-ray tomography, a research team has observed the internal evolution of the materials inside solid-state lithium batteries as they were charged and discharged. Detailed 3D information from the research could help improve the reliability and performance of the batteries, which use solid materials to replace the flammable liquid electrolytes in existing lithium-ion batteries.

The operando synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography imaging revealed how the dynamic changes of electrode materials at lithium/solid-electrolyte interfaces determine the behavior of solid-state batteries. The researchers found that battery operation caused voids to form at the interface, which created a loss of contact that was the primary cause of failure in the cells.

Mark Esser’s picture

By: Mark Esser

Alot has changed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) during the past 120 years. For one thing, we were known as the National Bureau of Standards for the first 87 years of our existence. Then, in 1988, we became the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), to reflect our agency’s expanding mission and a renewed emphasis on boosting the competitiveness of American industry.

But as much as things change, they also stay the same. While much of our early work has been baked into the American economy, NIST continues to be a world leader in advancing measurement science. We still provide many of our original services, though the techniques and technologies have evolved.

Zetec’s picture

By: Zetec

Ultrasonic testing has uses in many industries, from aerospace to hydrocarbon exploration. By providing an efficient and accurate method for testing material for flaws, and thus paving a way for smarter, more targeted maintenance plans, ultrasonic testing can save companies time and money.

Companies leverage ultrasonic technology for their volumetric nondestructive testing (NDT) needs. The most advanced ultrasonic equipment is durable, often portable, accurate, and incredibly easy to use. An understanding of how ultrasonic technology has evolved over the years can aid in decisions regarding ultrasonic NDT in various industries.

Johns Hopkins University’s picture

By: Johns Hopkins University

Since they came into use in 1938, electron microscopes have played a pivotal role in a host of scientific advances, including the discovery of new proteins and therapeutics as well as contributions made to the electronics revolution. But the field of electron microscopy must incorporate the latest advances in data science and artificial intelligence to realize its full potential in the years ahead, according to a global research team co-led by Mitra Taheri, professor of materials science and engineering at Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering.

In a commentary in Nature Materials, Taheri and the team discuss a model for an open, highly integrated, and data-driven microscopy architecture needed to address future challenges in the field such as energy storage, quantum information science, and materials design. They recommend an approach that integrates artificial intelligence and machine learning into each step of the microscopy workflow, enabling experiments and discoveries not possible with today’s microscopy technology alone.

Elizabeth Benham’s picture

By: Elizabeth Benham

Each year during national Weights and Measures Week (March 1 to 7), we celebrate the contributions made by the weights and measures community to ensure accuracy and fair competition in commercial transactions based on weight or measure. This year’s theme, “Measuring Up to the New Normal,” was especially meaningful because 2020 will be remembered as one of the most unusual years we’ll likely experience in our lifetimes. The year highlighted how a common challenge can positively transform how we do business.


Weights and Measures Week commemorates the signing of the first U.S. weights and measures law by President John Adams in 1799. Marble bust by artist Daniel Chester French.

This year, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recognized the contributions made by the weights and measures community to sustain equity in the marketplace. Equity in the marketplace takes the effort of many people and institutions.

Silke von Gemmingen’s picture

By: Silke von Gemmingen

The global pandemic has radically impacted the supply chain and logistics industry, making the need for robotic automation more urgent than ever. With more than 70 percent of labor in warehousing now dedicated to picking and packing, numerous companies are gradually investing in logistics automation. But what happens when robots must handle an unlimited number of (unknown) stock-keeping units (SKUs)? These companies need a fast, reliable, and robust way to automate picking and placing a large variety of objects.

This challenge was taken up successfully by the Dutch company Fizyr. The computer vision company based in Delft focuses on enabling robots to pick unknown objects even in harsh logistics environments. The result is an automated vision solution that enables logistic automation in various conditions and applications, like item picking, parcel handling, depalletizing, truck unloading, or baggage handling. To complete the system with the optimal hardware, Fizyr integrates compact, robust Ensenso 3D cameras in combination with high-performance GigE uEye cameras from IDS.

Catherine Cooksey’s picture

By: Catherine Cooksey

New employees at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are often surprised to learn that our agency is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce. How could this be? On the surface it seems that the missions of the two organizations couldn’t be more different. The Department of Commerce would appear to be concerned with, well, commerce, while NIST is well known for its Nobel Prize-winning scientific and technological work.

But the connection can be explained through our agency’s mission statement: “To promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life.”

MIT News’s picture

By: MIT News

Buildings account for about 40 percent of U.S. energy consumption, and are responsible for one-third of global carbon dioxide emissions. Making buildings more energy-efficient is not only a cost-saving measure, but also a crucial climate-change mitigation strategy. Hence the rise of “smart” buildings, which are increasingly becoming the norm around the world.

Smart buildings automate systems like heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), lighting, electricity, and security. Automation requires sensory data, such as indoor and outdoor temperature and humidity, carbon dioxide concentration, and occupancy status. Smart buildings leverage data in a combination of technologies that can make them more energy-efficient.

Since HVAC systems account for nearly half of a building’s energy use, smart buildings use smart thermostats, which automate HVAC controls and can learn the temperature preferences of a building’s occupants.

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