Content By Shobhendu Prabhakar

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By: Shobhendu Prabhakar

In India, Mahatma Gandhi is one of the most revered leaders of our time. He was a man who devoted his life to truth and nonviolence. You may be wondering why I’m talking about him here. Well, we all enter our place of work with a set of values that influence how we see and approach our work. So it’s important to understand how what you believe aligns with what you do.

The more I read about Gandhi and these two of the many values he preached about and lived his life according to, the more I found I could connect and correlate truth and nonviolence to the idea and practice of quality. I’d like to share those connections with you.

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By: Shobhendu Prabhakar

Someone recently asked me why quality failures and safety incidents continue to occur despite organizations communicating their quality and safety visions to the workforce, developing and implementing quality and safety management systems, and campaigning day in and day out about quality and safety.

This is an important question, and the broad answer is that even the best systems rely on people to design them and to carry them out. Let’s call them the scriptwriters or authors, and the actors who follow those scripts. Let’s take a look at what I think are five key issues.

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By: Shobhendu Prabhakar

Historically, conventional wisdom among business managers was that the higher the quality, the higher the cost. This perception still holds true today among a few business managers. Common sense also tells us the same thing, i.e., to create higher quality products or services, organizations will have to spend more. However, is this perception the reality, and does common sense make sense in this scenario?

Here are five compelling arguments why higher quality means lower cost.

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By: Shobhendu Prabhakar

Why do we waste our time and effort completing checklist after checklist for tasks that we can complete even when half awake? Do we not have better things to do than complete checklists?

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By: Shobhendu Prabhakar

Whenever the term “nonconformance report” (NCR) comes into project home offices or construction and fabrication sites, it is often seen as a negative, and personnel are typically reluctant to accept it as a positive and powerful tool to improve. Perhaps, the “non” in nonconformance is the reason for this. This article explains why NCRs should be seen as friends rather than a foes, and how they can be used to improve a company’s projects, products, and services as well as its overall performance.