Content By Chad Kymal

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By: Chad Kymal

Deadlines for ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 14001:2015 registration have appeared on the horizon. Although we have 24 months to get registered to these new standards, some related timelines are looming even closer, notably scheduling a recertification or surveillance audit.

Some organizations have already passed their surveillance audits since the standards’ publication in 2015, but most audits have yet to take place. Many organizations will begin their recertification audits to ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 14001:2015 around the middle of 2017. This doesn’t leave a lot of time for updating management systems to comply with new requirements.

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By: Chad Kymal

In 2014, the International Automotive Task Force (IATF) reported that the automotive industry wouldn’t upgrade the ISO/TS 16949 standard to ISO 9001:2015, much to the dismay of Tier One suppliers. In a survey that same year, Tier One suppliers related their desire to update their management systems to ISO 9001. Additionally, they weren’t happy with the industry’s onerous customer-specific requirements.

It’s interesting to note that many years ago, QS-9000, the predecessor to ISO/TS 16949, was written to reduce the proliferation of standards in the automotive industry. The number of new requirements coming from both the OEMs and Tier Ones in the last few years definitely looks like a return to the pre-QS-9000 days.

The IATF took two steps based on this feedback from Tier One suppliers. First, they would update ISO/TS 16949 to ISO 9001:2015, and that they were going to create a task force to do so. Second, they would try to understand customer needs before embarking on the change.

When evaluating a new draft standard against the current ISO/TS 16949, the following forces come into play (figure 1):

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By: Chad Kymal

The aerospace standard AS9100 Revision D was originally planned to be released in April 2014. Many of us close to the standard expected it to be released in May 2016 after the April International Aerospace Quality Group (IAQG) meeting in Singapore. However, this was not the case; the IAQG decided to release the English version, along with all the required IAQG language, in October 2016.

The late release of the standard, coupled with the September 2018 transition deadline date remaining unchanged, increases the pressure on organizations planning on transitioning to AS9100 Rev. D.

Let’s explore the challenges to organizations planning their transition by first understanding the changes that AS9100 Rev. D reflects; deciding on which of the other AS standards should be implemented along with AS9100 Rev. D; and looking at other decisions and strategies, such as using integrated management systems and related software. After that we’ll present the transition deadlines and consider their implications.

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By: Chad Kymal

ISO 9001:2015, ISO 14001:2015, and ISO 45001:2015 establish clear expectations for top management. Not only are executives accountable for the effectiveness of these respective systems, they also have specific tasks ranging from establishing objectives to supporting relevant managers in their roles.

All of these standards require that managers integrate requirements into the organization’s business process, thereby creating the need for an integrated management system (IMS). These managers will need to focus on the planning process to ensure that these systems meet the intended outcomes, as well as to establish performance objectives.

For those implementing an environmental management system (EMS), ISO 14001 expects the organization not only to include the prevention of pollution, but also protection of the environment. This requires top management to learn and understand what the standard means when it says “protect the environment.” Topics such as sustainability, climate change mitigation, and protection of biodiversity and ecosystems are suggested by the standard in a note.

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By: Chad Kymal

The outward focus of an organization comes from defining the context, mission, vision, policies, and interested-party expectations. A company’s goals and objectives provide the lens through which this outward focus can be seen (figure 1).

Chad Kymal
By: Chad Kymal, R. Dan Reid

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Risk is not a straightforward concept. Definitions of risk vary, even within documents published by the International Organizations for Standardization (ISO). One ISO definition indicates that risk is the “effect of uncertainty on an expected result.” Risk is now addressed by ISO 9001:2015, “Quality management systems—Requirements,” the international standard for quality management systems (QMS), scheduled for publication next month. In it, organizations are asked to “address risks and opportunities.”

New language in the final draft international standard (FDIS) of ISO 9001 focuses on “risk-based thinking,” although it stops short of actual “risk management.” As a result, the international community is wrestling with how best to audit risk. What are the concerns of auditors? What does ISO 9001:2015 ask for?

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By: Chad Kymal

The final draft international standard (FDIS) of ISO 9001:2015 will be released in July, and the revised standard is slated for publication in September. Per Annex SL of the “Consolidated ISO Supplement,” some elements of the standard will be restructured to allow for easier integration of multiple management systems.

This restructuring follows a high level structure (HLS) required for all ISO management system standards and will result in the same subclause names, common texts, and terms and definitions for all the ISO management system standards. This is one of the major changes that will act as a catalyst for integration between standards or what we call “integrated management systems.” Generally speaking, integrated management systems refers to integrated processes that result in one management system to implement ISO 9001, ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001 (the new ISO number will be ISO 45001) or food safety standards such as FSSC 22000.