NIST’s picture

By: NIST

A new measurement approach proposed by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) could lead to a better way to calibrate computed tomography (CT) scanners, potentially streamlining patient treatment by improving communication among doctors. 

Hubert Gatignon’s picture

By: Hubert Gatignon

Health and economics are linked in more ways than just health insurance. When we look past the obvious, research shows us how brain scans, the gig economy, or even hospital queues are all part of the expanding domain of health economics.

Taran March @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Taran March @ Quality Digest

Life science companies are no strangers to data, so it would be easy to assume they are adept at making innovative use of huge amounts. Not necessarily. A tradition of rigorous scientific method and clinical trial hasn’t prepared them for the shifting inundation of big data or all its baffling potential. If anything, the reliable, “clinically proven” analytical habits of former decades have hampered some manufacturers from leveraging data in new and needed ways.

Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

For centuries, medical procedures, prescriptions, and other medical interventions have been based largely on experience—what is known about a set of symptoms. The doctor looks at those symptoms, tests you in various ways (blood tests, X-rays, MRIs), and interprets the results based on experience with past patients or what is widely known in the medical community. Then she prescribes a treatment. There are two problems with this.

Mike Richman’s picture

By: Mike Richman

Great quality is pretty much the same everywhere, but the cost of poor quality is not equivalent from industry to industry. For example, it’s conceivable (but I hope not probable) that this article may turn out to be a real bomb, or worse, a complete snoozer. What’s the cost of that poor quality? To you, the reader, it will likely mean little except some lost time. For me, as the writer, the reputational hit could be considerable. To Quality Digest, as the publisher of the piece, the fallout could be even worse—lost readers and advertisers.

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

Within the life science industry, federal and industry regulations have prompted the need for compliance, and that trend has only increased in magnitude and complexity.

Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

As the United States struggles with rising healthcare costs, reducing the amount of money pharmaceutical companies spend dealing with regulation, while at the same time meeting drug safety requirements, would seem to be competing interests.

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Taran March @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Taran March @ Quality Digest

It’s been a year and a month since Stephen McCarthy switched C suites, moving from Johnson & Johnson, where he served as vice president of quality system shared services, to Sparta Systems, where he’s now vice president of digital innovation.

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Laurel Thoennes @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Laurel Thoennes @ Quality Digest

Compliance to U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations has come a long way in the past 30 years. Here are the main changes. Have they affected your business?

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Graham Freeman’s picture

By: Graham Freeman

Many industries have no clear boundary between safety and quality culture. In fact, they are often closely integrated. Quality failures and nonconformances that require rework have been correlated with increased accidents and recordable injury rates in manufacturing organizations. These injuries are frequently the result of fatigue, workplace pressure, and the pressure from extra work due to quality failures.

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