Supply Chain Article

Tim Lozier’s picture

By: Tim Lozier

Quality management systems (QMS) have become strategic components that touch more and more of the business today. With new versions of QMS standards, and the enrollment of all people in the quality management effort, the need for cohesion from one system to the next is becoming critical.  

Guy Courtin’s picture

By: Guy Courtin

The digital age is well underway, and that accounts for every aspect of business. A 2016 Boston Consulting Group (BCG) survey says that companies that digitally transform their supply chains will be leaders in their industries.

Mike Richman’s picture

By: Mike Richman

During the June 1, 2018, episode of QDL, we presented a special look at the parameters of relations between the United States and China, from the shifting perspectives of culture, trade, and history. Dirk and I, along with Quality Digest CEO Jeff Dewar, offered up our thoughts on what it all means to those of us in the world of quality.

“Made in China: From Scary Bad to Scary Good”

Jeff Dewar’s picture

By: Jeff Dewar

What a week. On April 30, 2018, there were top-level delegations from two disciplines: In Beijing the Chinese hosted a cabinet-level delegation of U.S. trade representatives; and in Seattle, the ASQ hosted the Sino-U.S. Quality Summit, the first of its global summit series as part of its annual World Conference on Quality and Improvement (WCQI).

Qing Shan Ding’s picture

By: Qing Shan Ding

Tensions are escalating between China and the United States over trade. The Chinese government has announced retaliatory measures on a range of U.S. products, including cars and some American agriculture products after the United States listed 1,333 Chinese products to be hit by punitive tariffs of 25 percent.

Mike Richman’s picture

By: Mike Richman

In part one of this article, we discussed the origins of the United States and China, and how their relationship began to emerge.

Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

In part one we saw that China has made great strides in terms of product quality, notably in the tech sector. But it still has a long way to go in other products. Driven by the growing middle class, who like all middle class buyers want value for their money, and by the Chinese government’s desire to improve the tarnished “made in China” brand, there is a strong interest in improving product quality.

Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

Back in the 1950s and 1960s, Japanese products were synonymous with cheaply made. Anyone over the age of 50 probably remembers cheap Japanese transistor radios when they were a kid. We all believed, in the day, that the more transistors a radio had, the better. That wasn’t necessarily true, but try telling that to a 9-year-old. And of course, we all knew that Japanese radios might claim to have 10 transistors but really only five of them worked.

Conventional wisdom was U.S. made: Good. Japanese made: Bad.

[Read More]

Mike Richman’s picture

By: Mike Richman

In June of 1950, W. Edwards Deming began offering training to the Japanese Union of Scientists and Engineers (JUSE) on the precepts of statistical process control.

At almost exactly the same time, Communist North Korea invaded and nearly overwhelmed their southern neighbors, who were immediately supported by the United Nations. The three-year war that followed resulted in a split on the Korean peninsula that exists to this day, with a state-controlled economy in the north and a free-market capitalist manufacturing behemoth in the south.

[Read More]

Tom Middleton’s picture

By: Tom Middleton

Markets and manufacturing practices continue to evolve, and companies now outsource to an increasing number of global manufacturing and supply partners. As companies have pursued this broadened supply chain strategy, the ability to manage both business and quality risks has become more challenging.

[Read More]

Syndicate content