Risk Management Article

Christopher Martin’s picture

By: Christopher Martin

Lily Elefteriadou’s picture

By: Lily Elefteriadou

What self-driving cars want, and what people want from them, varies widely. Often these desires are at odds with each other. For instance, carmakers—and the designers of the software that will run autonomous vehicles—know that it’s safest if cars stay far away from each other. But traffic engineers know that if every car operated to ensure lots of surrounding space, local roads and highways alike would be clogged for miles, and nobody would get anywhere.

Dane Warren’s picture

By: Dane Warren

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Ken Kingery’s picture

By: Ken Kingery

The first in-car measurements of exposure to pollutants that cause oxidative stress during rush-hour commutes has turned up potentially alarming results. The levels of some forms of harmful particulate matter inside car cabins was found to be twice as high as previously believed.

Chad Kymal’s picture

By: Chad Kymal

When Philip Crosby announced zero defects as a philosophy during the 1970s, it was met with incredulity. There were already many articles written on the fallacy of such a strategy and the enormous costs of moving toward zero defects. Fast forward 40+ years, and zero defects has become a reality.

Ben Snedeker’s picture

By: Ben Snedeker

Storms like Hurricanes Irma and Maria as well as other natural disasters bring with them lots of uncertainty: Where will they go? How much damage will they cause? What is certain is that no matter where they strike, natural disasters knock out power.

Knowledge at Wharton’s picture

By: Knowledge at Wharton

NASA Chief Astronaut Chris Cassidy has lived for months on the International Space Station and has performed six spacewalks. “Imagine hanging out with a glass bubble on your head, one hand on a hunk of metal, Earth going beneath your feet at five miles a second, and the whole world listening to everything that comes out of your mouth on the microphone,” he said at a recent Wharton Leadership Conference.

Ann Cleland’s picture

By: Ann Cleland

If your hospital or clinic uses a Windows 7-based version of a Siemens PET/CT or SPECT system, it could be vulnerable to attack by a relatively low-skill hacker, according to a July 26, 2017, security advisory from the company.

Mike Richman’s picture

By: Mike Richman

Our most recent episode of QDL from Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. featured news, technology, and two great interviews. Let’s have a closer look:

Multiple Authors
By: Jack Phillips, Patti Phillips

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