Risk Management Article

Knowledge at Wharton’s picture

By: Knowledge at Wharton

The mismanagement of bet-the-company business crises has become pandemic. Consider just the most recent examples.

Gleb Tsipursky’s picture

By: Gleb Tsipursky

Let’s say you’re interviewing a new applicant for a job, and you feel something is off. You can’t quite put your finger on it, but you’re a bit uncomfortable with this person. She says all the right things, her resume is great, she’d be a perfect hire for this job—except your gut tells you otherwise. The ConversationShould you go with your gut?

Taran March @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Taran March @ Quality Digest

As manufacturing becomes increasingly oblivious of where one country stops and another begins, the responsibilities of quality managers have extended beyond the safely measurable and into the loosely regulated wilds of global competition. Quality control now requires a sense of how different cultures perceive the art of doing business. (Hint: It’s not always about teamwork and doing the right thing.)

Chad Kymal’s picture

By: Chad Kymal

What is enterprise quality? Simply put, it is a system where there is one quality manual, and a core of common processes, work instructions, and forms and checklists for a multisite environment. Why is this a good idea? Because it saves money.

Figure 1 illustrates how enterprise quality takes many isolated management systems and transforms them into a common one.

Michael Jovanis’s picture

By: Michael Jovanis

Sponsored Content

Particles of metal in children’s medicine. Adulterated baby formula. Spontaneously combusting smartphones. When scandal is only a tweet away, companies can’t hide from quality failures.

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

Sponsored Content

Timothy Lozier’s picture

By: Timothy Lozier

Compliance is a common term that is very broad, and many companies interpret compliance as a host of different items. It can be related to quality, safety, or operations, but it encompasses a long list of areas within the organization, including financial, risk, governance, sustainability, and more. Companies try to fit this broad category of compliance into a single term, which can be a daunting feat. However, compliance is not the only component on which companies should be focusing

Greg Anderson’s picture

By: Greg Anderson

The most astute executives in health systems are rightfully concerned about compliance risks in physician contracting. Among these risks are that a transaction or an arrangement between a hospital and a physician are consistent with fair market value (FMV) and are commercially reasonable (CR) as those terms are defined in the healthcare regulatory context.

Jon Speer’s picture

By: Jon Speer

If you’re in the business of developing medical devices, then risk and risk management become terms synonymous with your daily operations. Your overall task is to bring a device to market that not only provides a needed function to a patient, but is also proven to be safe to use—maybe even used by someone who is near and dear to you.

Syndicate content