Content By Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s picture

By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

(Lawrence Berkeley National Lab: Berkeley, CA) -- A butterfly’s wings and a peacock’s feathers use nanoscale architecture to bend light and produce brilliant colors without pigments or dyes, and scientists have been trying to emulate nature’s design.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s picture

By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

(Lawrence Berkeley National Lab: Berkeley, CA) -- The ephemeral electron movements in a transient state of a reaction important in biochemical and optoelectronic processes have been captured and, for the first time, directly characterized using ultrafast X-ray spectroscopy at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s picture

By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

(Lawrence Berkeley National Lab: Berkeley, CA) -- A team of scientists at Berkeley Lab has developed an unsupervised multiscale machine learning technique that can automatically and specifically capture biomedical events or concepts directly from raw data.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s picture

By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

There’s a known rule-breaker among materials, and a new discovery by an international team of scientists adds more evidence to back up the metal’s nonconformist reputation. According to a new study led by scientists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and at the University of California, Berkeley, electrons in vanadium dioxide can conduct electricity without conducting heat.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s picture

By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

(Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Berkeley, CA) -- A major automaker came to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory recently wanting to better understand battery degradation. After many months of intense collaborative research with a Berkeley Lab battery scientist, the automaker gleaned some important insights into the conditions that may lead to battery failure, and even published a paper on its findings.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s picture

By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

With winter around the corner, some homeowners may be thinking about plugging all the leaks in their homes to make them less drafty. Imagine if every homeowner in the country did that: How much energy could be saved? Using physics-based modeling of the U.S. housing stock, researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) found in a new study that upgrading airtightness to a uniform level could achieve as much as $33 billion in annual energy savings.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s picture

By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory


The chemical secrets of a concrete Roman breakwater that has spent the last 2,000 years submerged in the Mediterranean Sea have been uncovered by an international team of researchers. The team has pinpointed why the best Roman concrete was superior to most modern concrete in durability, why its manufacture was less environmentally damaging, and how these improvements could be adopted in the modern world.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s picture

By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

On those sweltering summer days—when it’s too hot to play at the playground, it seems like you could fry an egg on the pavement, and your car feels like an oven after a couple hours parked at the mall—it’s not just the beating sun that’s driving up the temperature. It’s our very urban environment, in which most of our paved surfaces are dark, absorbing almost all of the sunlight that shines down on them.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s picture

By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

(Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Berkeley, CA) -- A long-time staple of science fiction is the tractor beam, a technology in which light is used to move massive objects—recall the tractor beam in the movie Star Wars that captured the Millennium Falcon and pulled it into the Death Star. Although tractor beams of this sort remain science fiction, beams of light today are being used to mechanically manipulate atoms or tiny glass beads, with rapid progress being made to control increasingly larger objects.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s picture

By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

The expression “beauty’s only skin-deep” has often been applied to the chemistry of materials because so much action takes place at the surface. However, for many of the materials in today’s high technologies, such as semiconductors and superconductors, once a device is fabricated, it is the electronic structures below the surface, in the bulk of the material or in buried layers, that determine its effectiveness.