Content By Innovating Service With Chip Bell

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By: Innovating Service With Chip Bell

Many years ago, I worked for the president of a bank famous for aggressive bank acquisitions and rapid growth in the financial services space. The bank ultimately became the Bank of America, and the president became its CEO. Hugh McColl was famous for his swashbuckling leadership style, his brilliant strategy execution, and his sometimes irreverent style of communications, especially when the media were involved.

When the bank purchased Barnett Bank, the largest bank in Florida, McColl commissioned the construction of a large high-rise in Tampa, Florida, which the locals called the “Beer Can Building.” It was a tall circular structure that dominated the Tampa skyline. When asked if he had plans to put the bank name or logo on the side of the building, McColl wisecracked, “You wouldn’t think of putting a sign on a female that proclaimed ‘woman,’ would you?” The media had a field day with this metaphor.

Innovating Service With Chip Bell’s picture

By: Innovating Service With Chip Bell

Parking lot. We use it in the meeting-management world to mean agenda items that are tabled for later discussion. These are generally posted on a sheet of flip-chart paper, taped on the meeting wall, and then placed on the agenda of the next meeting so they are not forgotten as topics for discussion.

Innovating Service With Chip Bell’s picture

By: Innovating Service With Chip Bell

Visioning beyond the customer is the responsibility of every person interested in a competitive advantage.

What do Bill Marriott, Ray Kroc, and Al Hopkins have in common?

No, they are not all people of wealth and fame. In fact, Hopkins is a small-town accountant and part-time preacher. They all are (or were) innovative disruptors who discovered new ways to better serve customers and trigger service transformations. They saw the way a given service was being delivered and found a new way to turn it completely on its ear.

Innovating Service With Chip Bell’s picture

By: Innovating Service With Chip Bell

I recently had eye surgery that required me to sleep on my back for two weeks following the operation. I have always slept on my side, ever since I was a kid. My back-sleeping attempts are so challenging, I am never able to nap on those United States to Europe flights. I usually end up burning a gazillion frequent flyer points to get a pricey seat that reclines to a flatbed—just so I can turn on my side!

Innovating Service With Chip Bell’s picture

By: Innovating Service With Chip Bell

Standing in the gate area of Delta Airlines at the Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport, I was watching the monitor to learn if my name appeared on the “upgrade to first class” list. Honestly, I was feeling totally entitled since I fly a gazillion miles a year on Delta.

Innovating Service With Chip Bell’s picture

By: Innovating Service With Chip Bell

The 1962 film, Lawrence of Arabia, won the Oscar for Best Picture at the 35th Academy Awards. Given the current conflicts in the Middle East, I recently watched the four-hour movie to learn more about the cultural history of the area.

Innovating Service With Chip Bell’s picture

By: Innovating Service With Chip Bell

The coolest birthday present I ever received was a gift from my wife a number of years ago; it was a white 1962 Mercedes-Benz 220 sedan reasonably well-restored. But the classy antique car, with its deep fenders and leather seats, turned out to be a real lemon. That’s about all I remember about the car. But I remember a lot about Brothers Auto Service near Charlotte, North Carolina, where my elegant birthday present was frequently nursed back to health during the two years I tried to depend on it.

Innovating Service With Chip Bell’s picture

By: Innovating Service With Chip Bell

I do not at all understand the mystery of grace—only that it meets us where we are but does not leave us where it found us.
—Anne Lamott

Innovating Service With Chip Bell’s picture

By: Innovating Service With Chip Bell

Variation and defects. They are the bane of all manufacturing companies. They signal an absence of efficiency, a neglect of productivity, and a total disregard for cost effectiveness. Who is seen as the rescuing knight in shining armor? Sir Six Sigma!

Fundamentally, Six Sigma (always capitalized, mind you) is a data-based discipline, a collection of principles, and a set of tools designed to identify and eliminate defects by minimizing process variability.

Innovating Service With Chip Bell’s picture

By: Innovating Service With Chip Bell

What if you were required to fill out an online form if you wanted the phone number or address of an enterprise with which you wanted to do business? Let’s say you were driving to a meeting at their location and you needed to contact someone to let them know you were unavoidably detained. You would have to pull over on the side of the road, fill out the online form, and wait for a response, which would make you even later. Sound ludicrous?