Content By Tim Lozier

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By: Tim Lozier

Quality management systems (QMS) have become strategic components that touch more and more of the business today. With new versions of QMS standards, and the enrollment of all people in the quality management effort, the need for cohesion from one system to the next is becoming critical.  

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By: Tim Lozier

Corrective action is often an effective means of identifying and correcting quality and compliance events within the organization that can arise through the result of complaints, audits, incidents, nonconformances, or any adverse events. Traditionally, the corrective action process is designed to handle systemic events—things that pose a major threat to the overall health of the quality management system (QMS) or environmental health and safety (EHS) system.

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By: Tim Lozier

The concepts and frameworks behind quality management are evolving. As more companies adopt new technologies, and standards like ISO 9001:2015 begin to shift in focus, there is a concept that is arising out of Industry 4.0, the factory of the future, and the industrial internet of things (IIoT). This concept, known as Quality 4.0 and the digital transformation of quality, combines the elements of technology, process innovation, and risk-based thinking to provide greater visibility and control into quality processes.

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By: Tim Lozier

Enterprise software solutions have become commonplace, and in many organizations, quality management systems (QMS) are a strategic priority.

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By: Tim Lozier

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The difference between cloud providers is often found in their chosen deployment method. Typically, software can be implemented either through multi-tenant or dedicated cloud environments. With the advent of virtual servers, cloud environments have moved past the “trend” phase and are now a reality, and almost a standard, of many quality management system (QMS) software offerings.

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By: Tim Lozier

The dynamic of risk management and compliance seems to be experiencing a shift toward risk management in operations, and learning to pay attention to detail in order to leverage it.

The biggest question often asked is, “I’m aware my company needs to pay great attention to the detail of risk, but I don’t know where to start, or even how to put it into practice.”

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By: Tim Lozier

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For quality management to be effective, a solid corrective action process is critical. ISO standards and general best-practice guides suggest—and even mandate—a set procedure and proper documentation for addressing and correcting issues.

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By: Tim Lozier

When it comes to quality management, it’s not just about the requirements. As companies register to ISO 9001:2015, we see an additional shift. Not only are management system requirements changing to build an improved framework for the standard, but we also see an emphasis on an overall mindset that prioritizes quality.

With that in mind, the question remains: How can we work together as a team to promote a companywide commitment to quality in a centralized and common way?

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By: Tim Lozier

Recently, there has been a shift in the way quality is led and implemented in organizations. The updated ISO 9001 standard urges leaders to incorporate quality in all levels of business, from stakeholders to upper management and throughout the entire organization. The new view is this: Quality is everyone’s responsibility, and team leaders should be working to make quality a priority for everyone.

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By: Tim Lozier

When we look at business dynamics, regardless of industry, we see an increasing rate of change in products, processes, and regulations. One process affects the next, and with a growing focus on regulations and standards, complexity becomes an ever-expanding theme, whether related to quality management or general compliance.