Content By Tim Lozier

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By: Tim Lozier

Enterprise software solutions have become commonplace, and in many organizations, quality management systems (QMS) are a strategic priority.

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By: Tim Lozier

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The difference between cloud providers is often found in their chosen deployment method. Typically, software can be implemented either through multi-tenant or dedicated cloud environments. With the advent of virtual servers, cloud environments have moved past the “trend” phase and are now a reality, and almost a standard, of many quality management system (QMS) software offerings.

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By: Tim Lozier

The dynamic of risk management and compliance seems to be experiencing a shift toward risk management in operations, and learning to pay attention to detail in order to leverage it.

The biggest question often asked is, “I’m aware my company needs to pay great attention to the detail of risk, but I don’t know where to start, or even how to put it into practice.”

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By: Tim Lozier

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For quality management to be effective, a solid corrective action process is critical. ISO standards and general best-practice guides suggest—and even mandate—a set procedure and proper documentation for addressing and correcting issues.

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By: Tim Lozier

When it comes to quality management, it’s not just about the requirements. As companies register to ISO 9001:2015, we see an additional shift. Not only are management system requirements changing to build an improved framework for the standard, but we also see an emphasis on an overall mindset that prioritizes quality.

With that in mind, the question remains: How can we work together as a team to promote a companywide commitment to quality in a centralized and common way?

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By: Tim Lozier

Recently, there has been a shift in the way quality is led and implemented in organizations. The updated ISO 9001 standard urges leaders to incorporate quality in all levels of business, from stakeholders to upper management and throughout the entire organization. The new view is this: Quality is everyone’s responsibility, and team leaders should be working to make quality a priority for everyone.

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By: Tim Lozier

When we look at business dynamics, regardless of industry, we see an increasing rate of change in products, processes, and regulations. One process affects the next, and with a growing focus on regulations and standards, complexity becomes an ever-expanding theme, whether related to quality management or general compliance.

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By: Tim Lozier

We recently passed a milestone moment in the hearts and minds of fantasy fan boys like myself. October 21, 2015, marked the day that Marty McFly and Dr. Emmett Brown traveled back to the future in the highly successful sequel, Back to the Future II.

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By: Tim Lozier

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We’ve all heard it before: Change is the only constant. This isn’t just cliché but a truth that all companies will come to recognize. Change is the driving force behind improvement. And all of the changes that take place within an organization, whether to products, processes, or regulations, aren’t isolated. Each has an impact on the other.

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By: Tim Lozier

With the recent release of the movie The Avengers: Age of Ultron, now is the perfect time to contemplate whether Tony Stark, aka Iron Man, needs a quality management system (QMS) to help him identify and prevent the disasters that seem to plague him.