Content By Jeffrey Phillips

Jeffrey Phillips’s picture

By: Jeffrey Phillips

I

was thinking over the weekend that for years we've positioned innovation incorrectly. Too often we position innovation as creating a new and valuable offering or solution, ready when customers demand new products and services. In other words, we've positioned innovation as something to do to prepare for future business, future needs, and future demands. 

Jeffrey Phillips’s picture

By: Jeffrey Phillips

Lately I’ve been reading about the efforts to build or create innovation accelerators. Universities, businesses, and even cities and regions are talking about innovation and the need to create accelerators or innovation enablers. I’m glad that everyone is excited about innovation, and that they want to provide the means to help it flourish and move more quickly. But the thing is, like most late arrivals, they’ve got the wrong end of the stick as the Brits like to say.

Jeffrey Phillips’s picture

By: Jeffrey Phillips

I have just returned from a trip to Dubai to speak at an innovation conference there. This is my third trip to Dubai, and I always come away consistently amazed at what the people and the government are doing. When I return to the States, people ask me what Dubai is like. I joking tell them that I was visiting the future.

Jeffrey Phillips’s picture

By: Jeffrey Phillips

The attempt to eliminate noise from an operating system or a business process is an interesting and perhaps worthwhile challenge, until one considers the question: What is the real signal? What is creating the noise?

Jeffrey Phillips’s picture

By: Jeffrey Phillips

I love innovation. I love all facets of it: the discovery of needs, creativity, unique solutions, and the realization of ideas as new products and services. But what concerns me sometimes is the way in which we attempt to implement innovation, because we are likely to constrain it at the time we need it most.

Jeffrey Phillips’s picture

By: Jeffrey Phillips

The tone of this article is a bit tongue in cheek, but the point is quite serious. Innovators go through a number of phases as they accept the reality of innovation based on what executives and corporate culture allow. Growing as an innovator is something like experiencing the seven stages of grief, only it’s often done in reverse.

Jeffrey Phillips’s picture

By: Jeffrey Phillips

Jeffrey Phillips’s picture

By: Jeffrey Phillips

It’s the natural order of economics that when an opportunity becomes available, everything rushes in to fill the vacuum. As the market becomes crowded, various offerings must differentiate themselves from the others to demonstrate value. So it’s almost inevitable that innovation will grow to become an amorphous blob of ideas, techniques, processes, “experts,” software, and a host of other things.

Jeffrey Phillips’s picture

By: Jeffrey Phillips

Not long ago a new client asked our team to lead an innovation project to create a product. As always with a new client, we did a quick survey. It’s important to understand what the client knows and has attempted in the name of innovation.