Content By Stacey Jarrett Wagner

Stacey Jarrett Wagner’s picture

By: Stacey Jarrett Wagner

Stacey Jarrett Wagner’s picture

By: Stacey Jarrett Wagner

In college I learned about chaos theory, sometimes called the butterfly effect, in which small differences in an initial condition result in divergent outcomes in dynamic systems. In layman’s terms, my fellow students and I were fond of saying that when a butterfly flutters its wings over your head, the repercussions will be felt, eventually, on the other side of the world.

Stacey Jarrett Wagner’s picture

By: Stacey Jarrett Wagner

England, during the 1760s, was the birthplace of the western world’s Industrial Revolution, initiated by a group of men who made “manufacturing” the purview of the inventive. Called The Lunar Society of Birmingham because the group met during the full moon, these inventors were amateur scientists and innovators.

Stacey Jarrett Wagner’s picture

By: Stacey Jarrett Wagner

In March 2013, a Manufacturing Leadership Council survey was conducted by Frost & Sullivan with 226 manufacturers. The survey’s intent was to understand manufacturers’ current workforce strategies, ask about future strategies, and observe key trends. Specifically, the authors wanted to know more about the availability of production-level employees. Well, they found out, and it doesn’t look good.

Stacey Jarrett Wagner’s picture

By: Stacey Jarrett Wagner

Approximately half of the 704 employers participating in a survey by The Chronicle of Higher Education and American Public Media’s Marketplace said they have trouble finding qualified college graduates to fill their companies’ positions.

Stacey Jarrett Wagner’s picture

By: Stacey Jarrett Wagner

Stacey Jarrett Wagner’s picture

By: Stacey Jarrett Wagner

There’s nothing I love as much as a paradox. So there’s a lot for me to get excited about with America’s current manufacturing paradox, which is whether U.S. manufacturing is the next big thing or a dying dinosaur. Should we steer our children from factory work, or should we embrace the opportunity to get out in front of something that changes every single day and has the potential to remake our society and economy?