Content By The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson

The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson’s picture

By: The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson

Many people are writing about innovation. Yet, the more I read, the more confusing the term becomes.

Some have said an innovation is an idea. Others have said an idea isn’t an innovation until it has been applied or implemented into a new product, service, or method. Hm, from my experience the hard part is coming up with the idea.

In an attempt at clarity, some have said that innovation is a new: product, service, design, method, technology, process, solution, experience, outcome, or trend. Yeah, that makes it clear!

Then there are others who have defined innovation as one of the following: adding value to a product or service; adding value to a company; finding new markets; moving toward the future; having a different viewpoint; or addressing challenges.

In my opinion this last one “addressing challenges” comes closest to a correct definition. So, let’s look at an actual dictionary definition. Here’s what Dictionary.com offers:

The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson’s picture

By: The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson

In this column I’ve written about embracing change because it prepares you to think more creatively, and it’s part of the innovator’s lifestyle. I’ve also written about accepting change even if you’re not completely comfortable with the idea because of the potential for emotional and intellectual growth. But I haven’t written about sudden unexpected change and how to deal with that, so that is the topic here.

The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson’s picture

By: The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson

A few years ago I wrote about a Facebook exchange between two friends of mine that upset me because one of my friends resorted to name-calling instead of addressing the other friend’s arguments. In retrospect, that was mild. More recently I’ve been shocked by some disturbingly excessive name-calling, in the comment sections of articles I’ve read, that was directed at other commenters. The name-calling is bad enough, but the number of people who find that to be an acceptable method for engaging in debate is appalling.

The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson’s picture

By: The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson

Last year I was invited to give a lecture on critical thinking to the U.S. Navy. I opened my presentation with a story I’d read in Reader’s Digest magazine as a child. It’s an old story you may have heard before, but it’s a perfect introduction to the importance of critical thinking. Here’s how it goes:

The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson’s picture

By: The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson

Deb asked me, “Would you like to come over to my house tonight and learn about a business opportunity?” I’d met Deb on a church trip, and had been crushing on her for weeks. She could have ended her question with, “and scrub dirty toilets?” and I would’ve been there, because all I heard was “come over to my house tonight.”

The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson’s picture

By: The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson

“Throughout history, poverty is the normal condition of man. Advances which permit this norm to be exceeded—here and there, now and then—are the work of an extremely small minority, frequently despised, often condemned, and almost always opposed by all right-thinking people. Whenever this tiny minority is kept from creating, or (as sometimes happens) is driven out of a society, the people then slip back into abject poverty. This is known as ‘bad luck.’”
—Robert Heinlein

The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson’s picture

By: The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson

I recall, back in 1995, trying to decide whether to get an internet account. I only knew two or three people who had them. Email sounded like a cool idea, but you still needed to pick up the phone to get in touch with someone. (Remember when the question was, “Do you have an email address?” instead of, “What is your email address?”)

The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson’s picture

By: The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson

This column is primarily about human motivation, particularly being motivated by envy, a subject I’ve wanted to write about for years. It is a negative emotion that has been condemned by all cultures throughout history, yet it is a powerful motivator. Envy can be terribly destructive, and surprisingly... constructive.

Envy, as defined by Merriam-Webster, is: “painful or resentful awareness of an advantage enjoyed by another joined with a desire to possess the same advantage.”

The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson’s picture

By: The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson

Recently I was contacted by a reader asking me if I would suggest some exercises that he could use to think more creatively. That request has inspired me to write about some fun ways that you, too, can exercise your creative mind.

The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson’s picture

By: The Un-Comfort Zone With Robert Wilson

Fresh from making mud pies, Paul and I were coated in dirt from our elbows to our fingertips. We walked into the kitchen to clean up for lunch, where we found Rafe leaning against the wall, shaking, and crying uncontrollably. His face, wet with tears, was red, and a line of drool hung from his open mouth.

I was shocked. I couldn’t imagine anything that could make Rafe cry. He was powerful; twice my size and twice my age, he was the first older boy I had ever been associated with. “What’s wrong?” I asked.