Content By NIST

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

(NIST: Gaithersburg, MD) -- Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have created a chip on which laser light interacts with a tiny cloud of atoms to serve as a miniature toolkit for measuring important quantities, such as length, with quantum precision. The design could be mass-produced with existing technology.

As described in Optica,1 NIST’s prototype chip was used to generate infrared light at a wavelength of 780 nm, precisely enough to be used as a length reference for calibrating other instruments. The NIST chip packs the atom cloud and structures for guiding light waves into less than 1 sq cm, about one ten-thousandth of the volume of other compact devices offering similar measurement precision.

“Compared to other devices that use chips for guiding light waves to probe atoms, our chip increases the measurement precision a hundredfold,” says NIST physicist Matt Hummon. “Our chip currently relies on a small external laser and optics table, but in future designs, we hope to put everything on the chip.”

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

(NIST: Gaithersburg, MD) -- The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), a nonregulatory agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce, has announced the fiscal year 2019 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I Notice of Funding Opportunity. The program encourages domestic small businesses to engage in federal research and development that has the potential for commercialization. 

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

A new measurement approach proposed by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) could lead to a better way to calibrate computed tomography (CT) scanners, potentially streamlining patient treatment by improving communication among doctors. 

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

Engineers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) needed a way to secure smart manufacturing systems using the digital thread, so they turned to the new kid on the block... blockchain, that is.

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a method for evaluating and selecting optimal antenna designs for future fifth-generation (5G) cellphones, other wireless devices and base stations.

The new NIST method could boost 5G wireless network capacity and reduce costs.

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

(NIST: Gaithersberg, MD) -- Lasers play roles in many manufacturing processes, from welding car parts to crafting engine components with 3D printers.* To control these tasks, manufacturers must ensure that their lasers fire at the correct power.

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

A convocation of delegates representing 60 countries voted last month in Versailles, France, to implement the most significant change to the International System of Units (SI) in more than 130 years. For the first time, all measurement units will be defined by natural phenomena rather than by physical artifacts. The event was the 26th General Conference of Weights and Measures and was hosted by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures.

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

A convocation of delegates representing 60 countries voted last month in Versailles, France, to implement the most significant change to the International System of Units (SI) in more than 130 years. For the first time, all measurement units will be defined by natural phenomena rather than by physical artifacts. The event was the 26th General Conference of Weights and Measures and was hosted by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures.

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

The U.S. Department of Commerce announced that the 2018 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award will be given to two educational institutions, an organ donor group, a hospital, and a project management firm. A presidential-level honor, the award recognizes exemplary U.S. organizations and businesses that demonstrate an unceasing drive for radical innovation, thoughtful leadership, and administrative improvement.

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

(NIST: Gaithersburg, MD) -- The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) introduces the VSANS Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) instrument that will help scientists at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) explore objects at the size scale important for nanotechnology.