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Scott Gottlieb

FDA Compliance

Some of the FDA’s Major Policy Goals for 2018

A year of advancing innovations, empowering consumers, and streamlining regulations

Published: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 13:01

Twice a year the federal government publishes the Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions (Unified Agenda), which provides the American public with insight into regulations under development or review throughout the federal government. For the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), it gives us an opportunity to outline some of our efforts to modernize our approach to our work and improve our efficiency, while fulfilling our mandate to protect and promote the public health and uphold the FDA’s standard for regulatory decision making.

Although many of the FDA’s policies are advanced through guidance documents and other proposals, this annual list of proposed regulations provides one element of our policy agenda.

Patients and consumers across our country depend on us to regulate products in a predictable, efficient, science-based manner. We also serve the public health by:
• Advancing innovations and therapies that improve patient care, enhance choice, and provide competition
• Taking action against serious threats to public health, such as opioid addiction and addiction to the nicotine in cigarettes
• Empowering patients, consumers, and healthcare providers with accurate and up-to-date information
• Recognizing when scientific innovations warrant new, more flexible regulatory approaches to make sure advances in care can reach patients

In addition to these goals, we must continually adapt our regulations to enhance efficiency, improve our effectiveness, and update old and out-of-date requirements.

The FDA’s contributions to the Fall 2017 Unified Agenda address a number of these areas of policymaking underway at the agency, and are directly aligned with our key priorities.

Addressing the nicotine addiction crisis

To reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with combusting tobacco, we are proposing meaningful actions to advance our new, comprehensive approach to nicotine and the regulation of combustible cigarettes. These efforts include an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking asking critical questions related to our pursuit of regulation that would result in a targeted reduction of the nicotine levels in combustible cigarettes to eliminate or dramatically reduce their addictive value. At the same time, the FDA is taking new steps to facilitate innovation in products that can deliver satisfying levels of nicotine to adults who want or need such access without the same health risks associated with combustible tobacco.

As part of this plan, the FDA will also be issuing an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to look at how to best regulate flavors in tobacco products to limit their appeal to youth, while considering the potential role that some flavors may play in helping users transition away from combustible products. Further, the FDA will be issuing an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to solicit information that may inform regulatory actions the agency might take with respect to premium cigars, asking certain questions related to how we might define and regulate “premium cigars,” taking into consideration the health effects of these products and their patterns of use.

Advancing drug safety

The FDA will issue several regulations on drug compounding to help ensure the quality of medicines that patients need. We want to make sure that outsourcing facilities clearly understand which drugs they may compound and allow these firms to adopt more efficient, streamlined manufacturing standards, while ensuring they observe necessary safety and quality measures.

Focusing on the safety of prescription drugs, the FDA is also pursuing a proposed rule to establish national standards for the licensing of prescription drug wholesale distributors and third-party logistics providers, as part of track-and-trace requirements. By establishing national standards for all state and federal licenses issued to key parts of the supply chain, these regulations will allow for the effective and efficient distribution of prescription drugs throughout the United States.

Promoting food safety

The FDA continues to take steps to improve its oversight of food safety. To address critical issues related to the overall safety of the food we eat, the FDA intends to propose a rule on lab accreditation, which would establish a program to accredit labs to do food-safety testing, and to require that these accredited labs be used in certain situations.

Additionally, in the Unified Agenda, the FDA committed to pursuing a rulemaking that will clarify registration requirements for food facilities to better align how facilities and farms that perform similar activities are treated under the preventive controls rules and the produce-safety rule.

Empowering consumers

Many of our agenda submissions are part of a broader effort to empower consumers and patients to make more informed and effective health decisions and ensure they have appropriate autonomy over their choices, while continuing to ensure the products they consume and use are safe and effective. Consumers tell us that they want this information. We also know that consumers who have access to more diverse, safe, and effective options—and who have improved information about those choices—make better, more cost-effective decisions.

Providing better information on drugs: We have included a rulemaking that proposes a new type of patient medication document that would help ensure that patients have access to clear, concise, and useful written information about their prescription drugs or biologics, delivered in a consistent and easily understood format, each time they receive a medication from the pharmacy. We want to give patients the ability to make high-value decisions about the medicines they take, and help them use drugs safely and effectively.
Broadening access to nonprescription drugs: We are considering innovative action in the nonprescription drug area to expand the scope of drug products that can be made available to consumers without a prescription. We will be proposing to allow certain innovative approaches for demonstrating that a drug product can be used safely and effectively in a nonprescription setting. This will allow some drugs that would otherwise require a prescription to be marketed without a prescription through the use of innovative technologies and other conditions that will ensure appropriate self-selection and/or appropriate actual use of the nonprescription drug product by consumers. Examples of such conditions could include use of self-selection questions on a mobile medical app prior to permitting access to the drug, or other innovative technologies to improve safety.

Through the use of these types of additional conditions, we hope to create a new paradigm of drug safety with greater flexibility that will benefit patients and public health. We are committed to advancing this new framework to enable a potentially broader selection of nonprescription products for consumers, empowering them to self-treat more common conditions and chronic conditions. This also could help lower costs by increasing the availability of products that would otherwise be available only by prescription.

Modernizing standards

We also are working to ensure the efficiency of existing regulations—a key focus of the Unified Agenda—by making sure that our standards are clearly defined, that they advance our public health goals and help promote the protection of consumers, and achieve these goals in an efficient way that does not place unnecessary burdens on those we regulate. We also want to ensure that our standards and regulations are modern and reflect the latest science, and have not become outdated, obsolete, or otherwise not applicable to the current environment.

Harmonizing global standards. We will be updating the FDA’s requirements for accepting foreign clinical data used to bring new medical devices to market. While helping to ensure the quality and integrity of clinical trial data and the protection of study participants, this rule should also reduce the burden on industry because it will harmonize with the standards currently used in drug regulation.
Modernizing mammography standards. We will be proposing a rule to modernize mammography quality standards that will improve women’s health. Our aim is to recognize advances in technology and help to ensure women get the most relevant, up-to-date information about their breast density, which is now recognized as a risk factor for breast cancer. This information can help doctors and patients make more informed decisions about further imaging.
Embracing electronic submissions. We will propose a new framework that will allow the FDA and product developers to take greater advantage of the efficiency of electronic, rather than paper, submissions for devices and veterinary drugs.
Removing outdated rules. We will propose to remove an outdated inspection provision for biologics and outdated drug sterilization requirements to remove barriers to the use of certain sterilization techniques.

Looking to the future

The FDA serves Americans by delivering on the critical mission of protecting and promoting the public health. The more than 70 actions we have identified as part of the Fall 2017 Unified Agenda will help us even better deliver on this mission. But regulation is only one way in which we can foster our mission and improve American health.

During the next year, we will also tackle many additional priority areas through guidance documents and other policy efforts. These areas will include efforts to reduce the cost of drugs by encouraging competition, spur innovation across medical products, give consumers access to clear and consistent nutrition information, create greater regulatory efficiencies in bringing products to market, and put a dent in the opioid addiction crisis facing our country.

Further, just because a previously identified regulation does not appear on this Unified Agenda submission does not necessarily mean the agency does not consider it a priority or will not continue to consider it moving forward. Look for additional information about the many initiatives identified in the Fall 2017 Unified Agenda as we advance all of these goals.

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About The Author

Scott Gottlieb’s picture

Scott Gottlieb

Scott Gottlieb, M.D., is the commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.