Innovation Article

Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest


In our April 13, 2018, episode of QDL, we talked about anti-hacker robots, data privacy, and new product introduction.

“HoneyBot Lures in Digital Troublemakers”

MIT nerds come up with a tasty target for IoT hackers. But this one fights back.

Knowledge at Wharton’s picture

By: Knowledge at Wharton

America’s healthcare system has been on the examining table lately: from the tortuous battle over the Affordable Care Act, to Senator Bernie Sanders’ bill to allow low-cost prescription drugs in from Canada, to the intriguing announcement in January that Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JPMorgan Chase would create an independent healthcare company for their employees.

Frank Defesche’s picture

By: Frank Defesche

Your company leadership team just issued a corporate goal (aka mandate) of reducing defects to fewer than five per million units made. This goal is coupled with a need to reduce manufacturing costs by 10 percent while meeting new good manufacturing practices (GMP) or ISO standards. Oh, and you have four audits coming up in the next two months. 

Georgia Tech News Center’s picture

By: Georgia Tech News Center

It’s small enough to fit inside a shoebox, yet this robot on four wheels has a big mission: keeping factories and other large facilities safe from hackers.

Meet the HoneyBot. Developed by a team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, the diminutive device is designed to lure in digital troublemakers who have set their sights on industrial facilities. HoneyBot will then trick the bad actors into giving up valuable information to cybersecurity professionals.

Dan Jacob’s picture

By: Dan Jacob

Developing profitable, timely, high-quality products is more important today than ever before. Visibility of in-use product performance has never been higher, while competitive pressures continue to squeeze margins and time to market.

Asimina Kiourti’s picture

By: Asimina Kiourti

Archaeology reveals that humans started wearing clothes some 170,000 years ago, very close to the second-to-last ice age. Even now, though, most modern humans wear clothes that are only barely different from those earliest garments. But that’s about to change as flexible electronics are increasingly woven into what are being called “smart fabrics.”

Malvina Eydelman’s picture

By: Malvina Eydelman

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Breakthrough Devices Program is beginning to show important results for patients since it was established in late 2016 under the 21st Century Cures Act to help patients gain timely access to breakthrough technologies.

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

In part one of this article, we explored how Woodland Trade Co. (WTC) leveraged high-accuracy portable CMMs to help land tight-tolerance aerospace contracts, and even earn Boeing’s Supplier of the Year award.

Knowledge at Wharton’s picture

By: Knowledge at Wharton

Instead of the internet of things (IoT), perhaps we should call it the “data of things” or the “internet of data?” IoT will generate a staggering 400 zettabytes (or 400 trillion gigabytes) of data a year by 2018, according to the 2016 Cisco Visual Networking Index.

Jeffrey Phillips’s picture

By: Jeffrey Phillips

There’s probably few activities that corporate folks enjoy less than corporate training. For most it’s guaranteed to be a slog, or a review of policies and procedures rarely used and important only to a specific team or set of circumstances. Most people assume they have enough knowledge to do the jobs they have, and they are often comfortable simply winging the rest. That’s why innovation often presents such an interesting challenge.

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