Content By Brad Egeland

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By: Brad Egeland

In case you haven’t heard this one before, “I’m big in Japan” is a way of boosting yourself in some unverifiable fashion. Specifically, it means, “To say or pretend you are someone of stature somewhere else, which is meaningless and not verifiable where you currently are.”

Many are guilty, at times, of overestimating reach, ability, and impact to make gains and win clients. We’ve seen some fall in this fashion, like the new college basketball coach a few years ago who had to let go of a great job and salary because he really didn’t have the degree that he said he did. Bottom line? If you say you’re big in Japan, then Japan better have at least heard of you.

But enough of Japan. On to project management. Let’s explore five top project management myths that might fall in the big-in-Japan category.

Brad Egeland’s picture

By: Brad Egeland

First off, let me state that I really, really believe that remote project management is a great solution for most projects. It has worked extremely well for me for the past 10 years or so. But I know it’s not for everyone. Remote project management, while often a sensible and cost-effective approach to managing many standard projects, is definitely not without its challenges. In fact, just in terms of communication, leadership, and relationships it can become very challenging.

Add in the rogue developer who is looking to become a one-man team, the business analyst with significant expertise in other technologies but who is “learning” a new one while helping lead your implementation, or the documentation specialist who is spread too thin across eight different projects but resides 1,500 miles away from you, and you can see how certain logistical issues can really impact your projects if you don’t learn to deal with each one of them methodically and carefully.

There are many things to consider when managing a very geographically dispersed team—and customer. Here, I’d like to look at just a few key ones, mainly focused on communication and experience. I’m open to readers sharing their thoughts and hopefully their own strategies for managing skilled resources from afar. Here are a few of my thoughts on the topic.

Brad Egeland’s picture

By: Brad Egeland

Project management office (PMO) directors. Are they game changers? Great leaders? Powerful enough to get the job done? Are they taken seriously by senior management? What about this: what about a central figure leading the project management infrastructure in an organization? It’s certainly not a new concept. Making that central figure a C-level officer in the company—now that’s a new concept. At least I’ve not seen it happen or even be proposed anywhere.

A search for C-level position definitions and examples reveals the following from SearchCIO.com:

“C-level, also called the C-suite, is an adjective used to describe high-ranking executive titles within an organization. C, in this context, stands for chief. Officers who hold C-level positions are typically considered the most powerful and influential members of an organization; consequently, they make higher-stakes decisions, their workload is more demanding, and they have relatively high salaries.”