Content By James daSilva

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By: James daSilva

When you think about Domino’s, you think about getting pizza quickly—30 minutes or less. Domino’s has also become known for technology, including flashy and fun concepts such as the Associated Talent Development (ATD) conference in Washington, D.C. There, attendees heard from Domino’s training and learning leaders Eric Kammerer and Drew Helmholtz about how they transformed a specific part of the operation: Training incoming multi-unit supervisors for the company’s corporate-owned locations.

Multi-unit supervisors are a key part of Domino’s 400 U.S.-located, corporate-owned stores, where each supervisor manages eight stores. This is an environment that requires skills of leadership, conflict resolution, time management, and financial acumen—not to mention managing differently from the hands-on, direct-control approach that a one-store manager might embrace. It’s also a potential pathway to executive positions.

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By: James daSilva

I have been thinking a lot lately about a maxim that Seth Godin likes to use: “What is it for?”

That phrase was mentioned often in his altMBA program I did a couple of years ago, and it can be a good focusing question for any of us.

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By: James daSilva

The news that General Electric ousted CEO John Flannery was surprising to many of us, and it certainly matters to investors, analysts, employees, and competitors (and probably, historians). But does the success or failure of GE’s CEO really matter that much when it comes to how most of us lead, manage, and plan each day? Not necessarily.

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By: James daSilva

One of the common complaints you’ll hear today is executives saying how there isn’t enough talent out there, not enough people with the right skills or even the willingness to learn. They say that people—almost always “young people”—are too eager to jump ship.

What are companies to do when there’s not enough talent and what talent there is will just leave?

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By: James daSilva

There’s a lot to be worried about in business: the political climate, robots and automation, the future of entrepreneurism and innovation, the promise or peril of the gig economy. But imagine if we weren’t in an economy that’s been growing for years.