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By: Quality Digest

By adding a laser probe to a coordinate measuring machine (CMM), Sonaca, a large Belgian aerospace-structures supplier, has greatly increased the completeness of its inspections, obtaining full documentation of every component’s geometry. When the company inspected sheet metal components in the past, 3-D shape was validated by using two complementary methods: Base shape was controlled by comparing them to Mylar patterns on a light table, and 3-D shape was controlled via manual methods.

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By: Quality Digest

Pressure decay has been the most widely used method of leak testing in manufacturing production lines for decades. The process is uncomplicated, inexpensive and easily automated. Air is simply injected into a test object and any decrease in air pressure over time signifies a leak. However, the pressure decay method has significant shortcomings such as limited sensitivity and the inability to determine leak location.

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By: Bill Chambers

So you have a great product, and there’s a great demand for it. You’ve addressed how to quickly produce it, and now you need to ensure the quality—fast. You can’t afford delays and need to keep costs down. One way to accomplish this is with fixture gaging, a simple, easy-to-use quality control alternative.Fixture gaging is an ideal alternative to using coordinate measuring machines, optical comparators or toolmakers microscopes, and is very useful for measuring relatively simple parts.

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By: Claes Nylander

Leak testing is an essential element in product quality testing for a wide range of industries. From the automotive industry to heating, ventilation and air conditioning manufacturing, countless products and parts have to be tested for tightness in order to meet specifications and be granted the positive end of the accept/reject option. In fact, for many suppliers to the automotive industry, leak testing is an integrated part of production: 100 percent of their parts are tested against a leak standard to meet quality requirements that are as important as the price or design of the product.

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By: Rick Hudgell

As industry standards increase, so too does the demand for flexibility in specialized gaging procedures. Because there’s no room for error, choosing the right contact point or styli is paramount in conforming to the organization’s high quality standards.

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By: Michael Metzger and Jim O'Brien

Many customers come to Hobson & Motzer seeking a solution for what others have claimed is impossible. Established in 1912 and based in Durham, Connecticut, Hobson & Motzer engineers manufacturing processes and designs tooling to produce seemingly impossible parts for companies worldwide.Hobson & Motzer is often selected for projects other companies aren’t able to accomplish. That’s why Hobson & Motzer people are called “quality critical” craftsmen. They see every part as critical and bring a can-do attitude to every job.

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By: Keith Bennett and Howard Zion

Test and measurement equipment (T&ME) must be periodically calibrated to ensure it’s operating within its specified parameters. Of course, the uncertainty of the system used to calibrate the equipment shouldn’t add appreciable error to this process.Test and measurement equipment (T&ME) must be periodically calibrated to ensure it’s operating within its specified parameters.

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

Shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging is quietly earning a growing place in industrial machine vision for quality inspection. SWIR imagers, sometimes also referred to as NIR imagers, can see objects and events that vision and thermal cameras cannot. Moreover, they’re’ smaller and lighter than all thermal cameras, and cost far less than many of them (See table below). Furthermore, most indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) SWIR cameras are all solid state, with no shutters, cooling systems or other moving parts.

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By: Gary Card

How many dimensional data points are enough to accurately describe a part feature? The key to answering this question is understanding the stability of the manufacturing process. In general, components should be measured only as often as required to ensure the stability of manufacturing processes.

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By: Gary Card

Coordinate measuring machines gather data by means of a probe or sensor. Conventional CMMs equipped with touch-trigger probes can use a stitch-scanning method to record point streams from part surfaces. In stitch scanning, the CMM lifts the probe head from the surface of the part, moves it slightly forward and lowers it until contact is made for every data point collected.

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