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AMACOM

Quality Insider

Book: Rescue the Problem Project

A complete guide to identifying, preventing, and recovering from project failure

Published: Monday, March 28, 2011 - 14:17

(AMACOM: New York) -- Author Todd Williams, certified project management professional and accomplished turnaround specialist, shares his field-tested project recovery process with every project manager struggling to avoid—or slog through—a disaster. It is also for, the author stresses, “anyone involved in a project—project manager, customer, project sponsor, executive management, steering committee member, or individual contributor—and trying to find the missing link in managing it.”

Rescue the Problem Project (AMACOM, 2011) leads readers through a step-by-step process of investigation, negotiation, and action. It starts with what Williams calls “step zero,” the prerequisite to success: the realization, particularly on the part of the project manager, that a problem exists and needs solving. After declaring a project “red” and accepting their new role as a recovery manager, project managers will follow four integral steps:

Audit the project. Acquire data about the subject. Determine the customer’s goals based on what is truly valuable to them in the product—the items critical to quality.

Analyze the data. Determine the options to meet the request. Weigh the available options based on the data accrued. Highlight the proposed solution’s advantages.

Negotiate the solution. Propose the options. Barter around the recommended solution to address the concerns voiced by the customer and management. Achieve the highest values for all stakeholders.

Execute the new plan. Close the deal. Document and implement the agreed upon solution.

 

Along this step-by-step process, readers will learn proven techniques for assessing a project’s scope, timeline constraints, budget, and methodology. They’ll develop awareness into not only the role of technology on project goals, but also its effects on team behavior. They’ll also gain valuable insights into rebuilding an extended project team—and regaining its members respect and commitment; proposing and getting agreement on a recovery plan; ensuring a smooth project start; and preventing the problems that derailed earlier project efforts from recurring. And they’ll become more adept at managing risk and managing change.

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About The Author

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AMACOM

AMACOM is the book publishing division of the American Management Association. AMACOM publishes nonfiction books on business, management, leadership, HR, training, communications, career growth, personal development, marketing, sales, customer service, project management, and finance. AMACOM’s editorial, production, sales, and marketing departments are based in New York, New York.