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Jon Gordon

Management

11 Thoughts About Teamwork

We > me

Published: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 11:00

(The Jon Gordon Companies: Ponte Vedra Beach, FL) -- Author and speaker Jon Gordon shares these 11 thoughts about teams. And check out his video clip, “The 3 C’s to Get your Team on the Bus.”

1. Teams rise and fall on culture, mind leadership, healing relationships, attitude and effort. Great teams have a great culture driven by great leadership. Relationships are meaningful and teammates are connected. The collective attitude is very positive and everyone on the team works hard to accomplish their mission.

2. It’s all about teamwork. Sometimes you are the star and sometimes you help the star.

3. If want to be truly great you have to work as hard to be a great teammate as you do to be a great player. I tell this to athletes all the time but the same is true for any profession. When we work hard to be a great team member we make everyone around us better.

4. Your team doesn’t care if you are a superstar. They care if you are a super team member.

5. Three things you control every day are your attitude, your effort, and your actions to be a great teammate. It doesn’t matter what is happening around you and who you think is being unfair. Every day you can focus on being positive, working hard and making others around you better. If you do that great things will happen.

6. One person can’t make a team but one person can break a team. Stay positive! Make sure you don’t let energy vampires sabotage your team. Post a sign that says “No Energy Vampires” allowed, and keep them off the bus. Most important, decide to stay positive.

7. Great team members hold each other accountable to the high standards and excellence their culture expects and demands.

8. Team beats talent when talent isn’t a team.

9. Great teams care more. They care more about their effort, their work, and their team members.

10. We > me. Unity is the difference between a great team and an average team. United teams are connected and committed to each other. They are selfless instead of selfish. They put the team first and know together we accomplish more.

11. You and your team face a fork in the road each day. You can settle for average and choose the path of mediocrity, or you can take the road less traveled and chase greatness. It’s a choice you make each day.

Which path will your team take?

Discuss

About The Author

Jon Gordon’s picture

Jon Gordon

Jon Gordon is passionate about developing positive leaders, organizations, and teams. One of the most sought-after speakers in the world, Gordon speaks on leadership, teamwork, culture, sales, and service. His clients include Southwest Airlines, The Atlanta Falcons, The Los Angeles Dodgers, Campbell Soup, Northwestern Mutual, Dell, Ritz Carlton Hotels, Wells Fargo, PGA Tour, Clemson Football, Intermountain Health Care, Denver Public Schools and more. He is the author of numerous books including The Energy Bus, The Carpenter, Training Camp, The Seed, You Win in the Locker Room First, and The No Complaining Rule, published by Wiley.