Featured Video
This Week in Quality Digest Live
Lean Features
Harish Jose
The dangers of misapplying linearity
Trevor Blumenau
Inexpensive wireless pick-to-light systems put warehouse productivity in reach for everyone
Bonnie Stone
Five critical lean tools
Tonianne DeMaria
You can’t step in the same river twice
Jordan Kraemer
Stop doing companies’ digital busywork for free

More Features

Lean News
Management's role in improving work climate and culture
Helps manufacturers by focusing on problems and problem resolution in real time
Ask questions, exchange ideas and best practices, share product tips, discuss challenges in quality improvement initiatives
It’s time that healthcare began to learn a long-term strategic approach to transformation
Combines 3D scanner, touch probe, and software to reduce production times by 30%
Phillips Precision rounds out Inspection Arsenal quick-swap fixturing with Loc-N-Load plates
Partnership for a Cleaner Environment (PACE) program has grown to more than 40 suppliers in 40 countries
Describes how the company applied lean tools and techniques across its products, processes, and partners

More News

Greg Cresswell

Lean

Which Is the Most Important Step in PDCA?

A water-cooler debate

Published: Monday, April 17, 2017 - 11:01

Occasionally, my colleagues and I will take a step back from the day-to-day and have a more philosophical discussion about the field of ergonomics. Recently, the question was raised, “In the plan-do-check-act continuous improvement cycle, which step is the most important?” This sparked some interesting debate. Here are the arguments we came up with for each step:

Plan. This is the foundation for the entire process. If you don’t have a strategic plan with goals and steps in place, how will you know what you’re working toward? This step ensures that everyone involved is aligned, knows their responsibilities, and is headed in the right direction at the start. This is probably the most commonly skipped step and, unfortunately, if it is ignored, your process may fail.

Do. This is the part of the process in which things get done, and it’s certainly the most visible step. One of the hurdles organizations often face is getting started. This is especially true in larger, very bureaucratic organizations. The argument for “do” being the most important step is that if it is skipped, nothing happens, and there is no process to begin with.

Check. Checking confirms that you’re on target to do what you said you would do. Regular check-ins confirm that everyone is in sync and progressing toward the end goal. When things aren’t on track, it’s a good time to readjust resources and timelines as needed. Without this step, there is no way to know if you’re on track. The process can still function, but at the end of the year, you may find that you haven’t achieved your goal, and omitting the check step may be the reason.

Act. During this part of the process, you reflect on what went well and what could have gone better. It triggers the continuous improvement. This step is critical for standardizing the parts of the process that are working, and tweaking the parts of the process that need more attention. If this isn’t done, you’re not running a “process,” just a “program”—something with a start and, likely soon, a finish.

In the end, all of the steps are important, but some people may gravitate to one step more than another because it aligns better with their strengths and interests.

For more information about the PDCA continuous improvement process, check out Humantech’s position statement, “Managing Ergonomics as a Continuous Improvement Process.”

Discuss

About The Author

Greg Cresswell’s picture

Greg Cresswell

Gregory Cresswell, Managing Consultant and Ergonomics Engineer for Humantech, leads large-scale ergonomics project deployments and helps organizations build internal expertise by delivering training sessions to engineering and safety personnel. Greg works closely with companies to understand their needs and develop a process that will allow them to integrate human factors into production operations.

Comments

Great question

I often ask this question when interviewing job candidates.  As you've noted, it gives great insight to the person's perspectives and interests.