Featured Product
This Week in Quality Digest Live
Lean Features
Gene Kaschak
Lean supply is not just about the size of inventory
OpusWorks
Eight unique best-practice sessions featuring 11 process improvement and thought leaders
Harish Jose
Learning how to better ask “Why?”
Del Williams
Advanced electrode boilers reduce risk of explosion, fire, and noxious emissions associated with fossil-fuel burning units

More Features

Lean News
From excess inventory and nonvalue work to $2 million in cost savings
Tactics aim to improve job quality and retain a high-performing workforce
Sept. 28–29, 2022, at the MassMutual Center in Springfield, MA
Enables system-level modeling with 2D and 3D visualization, reducing engineering effort, risk, and cost
It is a smart way to eliminate waste and maximize value
Simplified process focuses on the fundamentals every new ERP user needs
DigiLEAN software helps companies digitize their lean journey
Partnership embeds quality assurance at every stage of the product life cycle, enables agile product introduction
First trial module of learning tool focuses on ISO 9001 and is available now

More News

Lolly Daskal

Lean

Seven Basic Things Every Great Leader Should Know

To rediscover great leadership, we must return to the basics of leading

Published: Tuesday, August 18, 2020 - 12:02

In a recent survey, only 3 percent said they have confidence in corporate executives.

The news was equally dismal for others: 3 percent reported having confidence in government officials, 5 percent in reporters and journalists, 8 percent in small business owners, and only 11 percent in ministers and clergy.

These results show, among other things, how hard it can be to find the leader who can be credible, courageous, trustworthy, ethical, and transparent.

But we all know great leadership is possible—because we ourselves want it.

Here are some basic ways we can be the example of what it looks like.

1. Do what you say you will do. Too many leaders just do whatever they can get away with. Be credible.

2. Do what’s right, not what’s easy. This one can be hard; doing what is right is rarely easy. And many times leaders choose the wrong path. Be courageous.

3. Take responsibility for your actions. Stop making excuses for your decisions and rationalizing your choices. The more excuses they hear from you, the less people will trust you. Be trustworthy.

4. Stand by your convictions. Some leaders believe that high standards limit their opportunities. Everyone has their own level, but you cannot be a leader people admire if you don’t have strong convictions. Know what you value and believe.

5. Find clarity in transparency. For some the idea of transparency in leadership may be disruptive, but to be unrestricted and open ensures that those you lead are open and unrestricted with you. Today’s power is gained by sharing knowledge, not by hoarding it. Be transparent.

6. Maintain scrupulous honesty. Leaders need to be honest with themselves and others. They need to understand what they can do, what they cannot do, and consider what they can do better. It is better to be realistic about who you are than have someone call you out on your pretense. Be honest.

7. Value character above perfection. It is often said that character is the cornerstone of leadership, the thing that sets people apart as leaders. Be righteous.

We can always look at others and complain that they don’t have what we want in a leader—but the answer lies not with others but in each one of us.

We can be the answer to the call for leadership.

We can be the example that people want to see.

We can be the leaders that others trust and admire.

Lead from within: When we get back to the basics, we can always begin again to make it right.

First published on lollydaskal.com.

Discuss

About The Author

Lolly Daskal’s picture

Lolly Daskal

Lolly Daskal is one of the world’s most sought-after executive leadership coaches, with cross-cultural expertise spanning 14 countries, six languages, and hundreds of companies. As founder and CEO of Lead From Within, her leadership program is engineered to be a catalyst for leaders who want to enhance performance and make a meaningful difference in their companies, their lives, and the world. Based on a mix of modern philosophy, science, and nearly 30 years coaching executives, Daskal’s perspective on leadership continues to break new ground. Her proprietary insights are the subject of her book, The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness (Penguin Portfolio, 2017).