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Jesse Lyn Stoner

Innovation

Let’s Stop Confusing Cooperation and Teamwork With Collaboration

‘True collaboration requires an exchange of ideas where something new emerges as a result.’

Published: Thursday, March 28, 2019 - 11:03

Often the words “collaboration,” “coordination,” and “cooperation” are used to describe effective teamwork. But they are not the same, and when we use these words interchangeably, we dilute their meaning and diminish the potential for creating powerful, collaborative workplaces.

Collaboration was big in the news when Marissa Mayer explained her decision to bring back to the office the Yahoo employees working at home: “To become the absolute best place to work, communication and collaboration will be important, so we need to be working side by side.”

Mayer’s belief that we work together better when we have real relationships, and that it is easier to build relationships when you have face-to-face contact is not unfounded. Coordination and cooperation is essential for effective and efficient work accomplishment, and some research supports the notion that some face-to-face time makes a big difference.

A decision like Mayer’s might create better teamwork—cooperation, communication, and coordination—but it won’t create collaboration unless the intention is to create a collaborative culture.

Definitions

Collaboration is working together to create something new in support of a shared vision. The key points are that it is not through individual effort, something new is created, and that the glue is the shared vision.

Coordination is sharing information and resources so that each party can accomplish their part in support of a mutual objective. It is about teamwork in implementation. Not creating something new.

Cooperation is important in networks where individuals exchange relevant information and resources in support of each other’s goals, rather than a shared goal. Something new may be achieved as a result, but it arises from the individual, not from a collective team effort.

All three of these are important. All three are aspects of teamwork. But they are not the same!

We can find examples of effective teamwork in all types of environments—sports, military, and even historically in politics (e.g., Abraham Lincoln’s cabinet). All high-performance teams have common characteristics. But depending on their purpose and intent, they might rely more on coordination or cooperation than on collaboration.

When is collaboration important?

In a network environment, where there is not interdependence, collaboration is not essential to the creative process. Through cooperative sharing of information and resources, creativity emerges through individuals and is hopefully recognized and supported.

However, in an interdependent organization, collaboration is the bedrock of creative solutions and innovation.

If an organization is to reinvent itself, collaboration will be essential.

Collaboration will not occur by decree

Can collaboration occur at a distance? Absolutely, if (and this is a big if) leaders are intentional about building collaborative environments, model collaborative leadership practices, and create opportunities to bring people together for occasional face-to-face conversations.

Collaborative leadership is based on respect, trust, and the wise use of power. Leaders must be willing to let go of control. Collaboration does not naturally occur in traditional top-down, control-oriented hierarchical environments.

People need the freedom to exercise their own judgment. There has to be room for experimentation, failure, and learning from mistakes. And there needs to be an opportunity for people to think together, valuing each other’s perspective and contributions, in order for creative new ideas to emerge.

First published on Jesse Lyn Stoner’s website. © 2019 Jesse Stoner

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About The Author

Jesse Lyn Stoner’s picture

Jesse Lyn Stoner

Jesse Lyn Stoner, founder of consultancy Seapoint Center, has worked with hundreds of leaders using collaborative processes to engage the entire workforce in creating their desired future. Stoner has authored several books including Full Steam Ahead! Unleash the Power of Vision (Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2nd rev. ed. 2011), co-authored with Ken Blanchard. Stoner is recognized by the American Management Association as one of the Top Leaders to Watch in 2015 and by INC Magazine as one of the Top 100 Leadership Experts. Stoner has advanced degrees in psychology and family system, and a doctorate in organizational development.

Comments

Thanks for clarifying

We hear "collaboration" bandied about so much that it really ceases to have meaning. And the terms "coordination" and "cooperation" don't have the "sexiness" of collaboration, so it's nice to see them defined in their own rights.