Inside Standards

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

There have been a couple of great columns in recent weeks in Quality Digest Daily dealing either directly or indirectly with the subject of root cause analysis. Mike Micklewright gave us his spin on medical consequences of inadequate root cause analysis and Dirk Dusharme illustrated the pitfalls of gathering data and then not using it to do root cause analysis.

Steve Arbogast’s picture

By: Steve Arbogast

A quality management system is a framework of processes and procedures that are used to ensure that an organization can fulfill all tasks required to achieve its goals, strategies, and objectives.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

It was the great W. Edwards Deming who first applied this tenet, “Drive out fear,” to quality management in his book Out of the Crisis (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1982) It’s one of his 14 Points for Management.

Bill Kalmar’s picture

By: Bill Kalmar

The band “Chicago” sang those words about "time" decades ago. The second line “Does anybody really care?” seems to sum up what is still in vogue today, especially in the workplace. Just as with vacations where workers are reluctant to leave for fear that someone will discover that their job is expendable, those same workers are reluctant to depart their desk at the customary 5 p.m. quitting time.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

The final draft of the revised ISO 9004 standard is out for ballot. This means that it will hopefully be available before the end of this year. It’s radically different from the last version. For one thing, the title has changed. It’s now: “Managing for the sustained success of an organization—A quality management approach.”

Esteve Garriga’s picture

By: Esteve Garriga

Real estate bubble, subprime mortgages, financial system, stock markets, and finally, Main Street. The deepest crisis in decades is here, monopolizing media’s headlines, freezing our economies and strongly affecting us not only as citizens (or should I say consumers?) but also as quality professionals within our organizations.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

A father and his son were going to market. Their donkey was laden with the vegetables from their garden and assorted wares they were going to sell. The young son became tired and so his father lifted him up onto the donkey so that he could ride for a while. Shortly thereafter, they passed through a small hamlet where the people scorned the son for showing disrespect to his father. “Look at the son who rides while his poor hard working father who toils every day must trod along without rest.”

David C. Crosby’s picture

By: David C. Crosby

The most important element in producing a quality product or service is the attitude of the people doing the work—not only the worker—but the attitude of all levels of management. Employee attitude about the product, about the work, about the boss, and about the company will pretty well determine the quality of the work. By quality, I mean the absence of defects—conformance to the requirement—not the goodness of the product. However, goodness comes from attitude also.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

"The only man who behaved sensibly was my tailor: he took my measure anew every time he saw me, whilst all the rest went on with their old measurements and expected them to fit me.”

—George Bernard Shaw

Can you think of a more rousing or appropriate quotation to justify the ISO 9001 requirements relating to monitoring and measuring? How about the requirements for periodic internal audits? Or management review?

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