Inside Standards

David C. Crosby’s picture

By: David C. Crosby

The most important element in producing a quality product or service is the attitude of the people doing the work—not only the worker—but the attitude of all levels of management. Employee attitude about the product, about the work, about the boss, and about the company will pretty well determine the quality of the work. By quality, I mean the absence of defects—conformance to the requirement—not the goodness of the product. However, goodness comes from attitude also.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

"The only man who behaved sensibly was my tailor: he took my measure anew every time he saw me, whilst all the rest went on with their old measurements and expected them to fit me.”

—George Bernard Shaw

Can you think of a more rousing or appropriate quotation to justify the ISO 9001 requirements relating to monitoring and measuring? How about the requirements for periodic internal audits? Or management review?

James Odom’s default image

By: James Odom

Charles Kettering, the famous inventor, once said: “A problem well stated is a problem half solved.” This implies that a good portion of problem solving should be devoted to a thorough understanding of what’s going on before any corrective action steps are taken.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

E

mpowering people is a cool idea. Giving individuals authority and responsibility has many benefits. It fosters accountability and communicates confidence. It avails people the opportunity to contribute in a manner that allows their voices to be heard. They experience the self-satisfaction of knowing that what they say and do matters, that they can make a difference in their organization.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

A few months back, I wrote about the choices an organization makes regarding its quality management system (QMS). At that time, I talked about the overall system, with particular focus on management’s investment and support.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

I recently had a client who went through a pre-assessment in anticipation of his company’s certification audit. It’s kind of like a dress rehearsal for the real thing. Over the years, I’ve discovered that organizations tend to garner more value from pre-assessments than I had originally thought possible.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

Unlike many other requirements in ISO 9001, the subclause dealing with the ISO management representative is rarely the subject of debate. In fact, it doesn’t get nearly as much consideration as it deserves.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

A farmer was experiencing a serious problem with cranes eating his seed, so he decided to cast a net upon his fields in an attempt to capture the cranes. Along with the cranes, he snared a stork. The stork pleaded for his life saying, "Honorable farmer, I am not like these others who came to steal your seed. I am a stork." The farmer replied, "You may very well be a stork, but from the evidence here, I can only assume that you, too, have come to eat my seeds." And with that he slew the stork along with the cranes.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

Recently I became aware that the ISO 9001 requirements pertaining to preventive action are sometimes referred to as the “fortune-telling clause.” The deprecating implication is that attempting to implement preventive actions is as silly as relying on a two-bit sideshow palm reader to help you make life-altering decisions.

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