Inside Standards

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

Many of us quality professionals have been teased by our families on more than one occasion for applying quality principles to everyday life. “I know you said you did your homework, but I’d like to see the evidence.” Admit it; many of you have been caught using quality speak around the house. Others have used planning or improvement initiatives to handle chores and projects.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

Last month’s column dealt with how to effectively communicate a finding of nonconformity in an audit report. It’s pretty straightforward: Here’s the requirement; there’s the evidence. They don’t match.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

“Nonfulfillment of a requirement.” That’s the clear and concise definition of a nonconformity offered up by ISO 9000:2005–“Quality management systems—Fundamentals and vocabulary.” The definition leaves little room for ambiguity. A nonconformity is the identification of an incident involving either an error or an omission. Something wasn’t done or was done incorrectly.

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

In last month’s column, I postulated that the hazardous-substance-free movement represents a major paradigm shift and creates demanding requirements for industry, creating a much higher bar of performance for business. QC 080000 IECQ HSPM can be a help.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

Control of quality records: Can there possibly be a more boring requirement? You can feel the yawn coming on as you read through the requirements of ISO 9001 subclause 4.2.4.

Not only are you required to keep records, you’re required to have a documented procedure that describes how you maintain them. How do you convince a manager that this isn’t the ultimate pencil-pushing exercise? How do you demonstrate that it’s an effective process?

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

What data are the best to gather? What processes should you be tracking? What are your metrics telling you?

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

Last month, I shared some perspectives about the current state of the hazardous-substance-free movement and trends that are propelling its influence. This month I’d like to discuss what I think these trends mean to industry and the potential usefulness of QC 080000 IECQ HSPM.

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

This column and the next two take stock of the current state and future of the hazardous-substance-free (HSF) movement and its effects on industry, and share my perspectives on the potential effects of QC 080000 IECQ HSPM. A vision of the future: The industry will forevermore be held accountable for knowing, disclosing, and managing hazardous substances used in production processes and embedded in products.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

Subclause 6.2.2 of ISO 9001 is ubiquitously referred to as the training clause. That unfortunately narrows the focus to only one aspect of the requirement. The subclause is situated in the section of the standard that relates to provision of resources. It doesn’t simply require that training be provided; it requires that the human resource that has been provided have the necessary competence for the work to be done.

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

This month we provide the basics for compliance with the European Union’s Directive 2002/95/EC—“On the restriction of the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment.” This directive is commonly referred to as “RoHS,” for Reduction of Hazardous Substances, or EU RoHS, now that other countries have introduced their own RoHS-like directives.

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