Inside Health Care

Bill Kalmar’s picture

By: Bill Kalmar

Advancing into that mystical category of “senior citizen” brings with it certain perks.

Mike Richman’s picture

By: Mike Richman

Dr. Tomas Gonzalez, senior vice president and chief quality officer for Valley Baptist Health System of Harlingen, Texas, is a busy man. Not only does he direct quality process improvement at Valley Baptist’s two hospitals, he’s also a physician and a certified Master Black Belt. Valley Baptist had a banner year in 2007, including the achievement of a No. 1 U.S.

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

The cost of poor quality in health care ranges from 30 to 60 cents of every health care dollar. Until recently, however, there have been few financial consequences for health care providers’ failure to address the underlying root causes.

Georgia Institute of Technology’s picture

By: Georgia Institute of Technology

Research reported recently in the journal Advanced Materials describes a potentially promising strategy for encouraging the regeneration of damaged central nervous system cells known as neurons.The technique would use a biodegradable polymer containing a chemical group that mimics the neurotransmitter acetylcholine to spur the growth of neurites, projections that form the connections among neurons and between neurons and other cells. The biomimetic polymers would then guide the growth of the regenerating nerve.

Abby Vogel’s default image

By: Abby Vogel

Tushar Sathe holds a vial of dual-function beads embedded with iron oxide and 600 nanometer emission quantum dots, while Shuming Nie looks on. The other vials contain beads embedded with quantum dots that emit light at other wavelengths.

photo by Gary Meek

Georgia Institute of Technology’s picture

By: Georgia Institute of Technology

For people with impaired mobility and reduced ability to sense injury, the risk is high for pressure ulcers that can develop when they sit or recline in one position too long or wear a poorly-fitted prostheses for an extended period.

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

This figure shows the 3-dimensional dose distribution of the prostate upon completion of implanted seeds. Based on patient tests, Lee’s inverse planning system uses 15% fewer seeds.

Photo by Eva Lee

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

CardioMEMS engineer Michael Fonseca uses a laser to separate pressure sensors in the company’s clean room facility in the ATDC Biosciences Center located at Georgia Tech’s Environmental Science and Technology Building.

Photo by Gary Meek

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

Georgia Tech student Ashley Palmer, Ph.D., conducted experiments to validate a new cartilage-imaging technique developed by associate professors Marc Levenston and Robert Guldberg in the Georgia Tech School of Mechanical Engineering.

Martin Dittmer and Brooke Cox’s default image

By: Martin Dittmer and Brooke Cox

Despite the best efforts of pharmaceutical manufacturers, drug labeling is one of the greatest challenges in clinical trials, involving a complex, time-consuming process to meet strict regulatory requirements and obtain wide-ranging approvals from individual countries. That labels must contain a diverse range of information used by investigators, subjects and pharmaceutical companies alike compounds the problem.

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