Content By Ryan E. Day

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

Sponsored Content

Brian Vinson may have one of the best jobs in the country. Vinson works as director of engineering with AWE Tuning, an automotive aftermarket company that provides award-winning, handcrafted performance exhausts, track-tested carbon-fiber intakes, and performance intercoolers.

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

Coffeepots and tires. All products should be built like coffeepots and tires. Awash in a sea of disposable products, these two durable goods stand out as icons of heresy against designed obsolescence.

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

Sponsored Content

In a TED Talk, Geordie Rose, co-creator of the D-WAVE quantum computer, said, “Humans use tools to do things. If you give humans a new kind of tool, they can do things they couldn’t otherwise do—imagine the possibilities.”

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

Is it just me, or does it seem like businesses are actually trying to outdo each other in poor customer experience? Now, I don’t want to be misunderstood, so let me be as clear as I can.

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

Everything, it seems, has a vulnerability. For werewolves, it’s silver bullets. For Superman, it’s Kryptonite. For manufacturing—it’s rework. Rework means loss of throughput, which means loss of profit, which can mean death by a thousand rewelds. But, just as silver bullets can be dodged, and Kryptonite can be avoided, much rework can be prevented by adopting appropriate technology.

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

Sponsored Content

Although more than 140 years old, Colonna’s Shipyard Inc. has not stood still with respect to modernization. Colonna’s has made the capital investments necessary to improve efficiency and productivity—and those investments are paying off.

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

Sponsored Content

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

Sponsored Content

Variability is an inherent part of the measurement process. Purely from a statistical perspective, there are no “errors,” just products and parts that are either in or out of tolerance as per specifications. But whether variance can be considered an error or not, within manufacturing environments measurement mistakes often translate to migraines and lost profit.

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

You might say what Henry Ford did for the automobile, GE, Siemens, and Mitsubishi have done for the gas and steam turbine industry. Naturally, the tools and technicians of both sectors have had to evolve right along with the challenges of new technology and the ever-increasing demands for improved accuracy and efficiency.

If you work in a facility that looks something like this:

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

Sponsored Content

In today's hyper-competitive, fast-paced manufacturing world, there is rarely anything like a "routine" day at the office—especially when you're a tier-one supplier for some of the largest aerospace companies in the world. To make the grade and satisfy this kind of demanding customer base requires smarts, efficiency, hard work, and innovation. A little extra horsepower on the shop floor never hurts, either.