Cority’s picture

By: Cority

(Cority: Toronto, Canada) -- Cority, provider of environmental, health, safety, and quality (EHSQ) software, announces the availability of its enhanced quality management solution.

Designed to provide quality professionals with a closed-loop, continuous improvement process to ensure product safety and compliance, and drive operational efficiency, Cority increases visibility across the supply chain to monitor suppliers, capture customer feedback, and ensure the highest product standards. This latest release shows Cority’s commitment to providing organizations with the most comprehensive, integrated EHSQ solution to support their operational and compliance needs.

Teledyne DALSA’s picture

By: Teledyne DALSA

(Teledyne DALSA: Billerica, MA) -- Teledyne DALSA, a Teledyne Technologies company and global leader in machine vision technology, announces a compact, low-cost vision system for multicamera applications.

Rob Matheson’s picture

By: Rob Matheson

Democratizing data science is the notion that anyone, with little to no expertise, can do data science if provided ample data and user-friendly analytics tools. MIT researchers are hoping to support that idea with a new tool for nonstatisticians that automatically generates models for analyzing raw data. The tool ingests data sets and generates sophisticated statistical models typically used by experts to analyze, interpret, and predict underlying patterns in data.

The tool currently lives on Jupyter Notebook, an open-source web framework that allows users to run programs interactively in their browsers. Users need only write a few lines of code to uncover insights into, for instance, financial trends, air travel, voting patterns, the spread of disease, and other trends.

In a paper presented at this week’s ACM SIGPLAN Symposium on Principles of Programming Languages, the researchers show their tool can accurately extract patterns and make predictions from real-world data sets, and even outperform manually constructed models in certain data-analytics tasks.

L.S. Starrett Co.’s picture

By: L.S. Starrett Co.

(The L.S. Starrett Co.: Athol MA) -- The L.S. Starrett Co., a leading global manufacturer of precision hand tool gages, a broad range of force testing, metrology equipment, and more, has announced the introduction of a basic, affordable Spring testing solution designed for compression and extension springs. The new Starrett S1 Spring Testing Systems were developed for high volume production testing for users seeking more consistent results over manual testing methods. Click here for additional S1 product details.

Starrett S1 Systems feature easy-to-use test templates that enable the user to create a test set up in seconds using one and two-point methods, with test targets being load or height-based. In addition, the small footprint of the S1 System is ideal for either lean manufacturing environments or in-situ production areas. Spring rate, spring constant, free length, solid height and initial tension can be measured and tolerances can be utilized to determine immediate pass/fail results, which can be viewed in graphic or tabular formats.

Wiley’s picture

By: Wiley

How do senior leaders, in their own words, describe the most effective leaders—the ones that get results, grow the business, enhance the culture, and leave in their wake a trail of other really effective leaders? Conversely, how do senior leaders describe the kind of leader that undercuts the organization’s capacity and capability to create its future? The book Scaling Leadership (Wiley, 2019), based on groundbreaking research, shows how senior leaders describe and develop leadership that works, that does not work, that scales, and that limits scale.

ISO’s picture

By: ISO

(ISO: Geneva) -- The global construction industry is booming, bringing with it global construction projects and the need for efficient tools such as building information modelling for managing information. A new set of international standards has just been published to enable building information modelling to flourish across projects and borders, benefitting the industry as a whole.

As populations and economies grow, so too does the need for housing and infrastructure, fueling growth forecasts in the global construction industry of up to 85 percent—or USD 15.5 trillion—by 2030, according to the report, “Global Construction 2030.” More construction means a greater need for efficient ways of working, which is why the 3D model-based approach of building information modelling in delivering construction projects is gaining traction worldwide.

Building information modelling gives architects, engineers, and construction professionals the ability to plan, design, and manage building projects more efficiently. It is growing in popularity, creating the need for an international framework that allows the industry to work together across projects and national borders.

Dorsey Metrology International’s picture

By: Dorsey Metrology International

(Dorsey Metrology: Poughkeepsie, NY) -- Dorsey Metrology International announced that it has acquired the optical comparator and vision system product lines from S-T Industries.

On Sept. 28, 2018, S-T Industries shared the news that it would be closing and discontinuing all its product lines. Dorsey Metrology International has acquired all S-T Industries optical comparator and vision system lines, including all engineering files to continue servicing S-T Industries’ products in the field. Dorsey will begin to integrate support and service during the first quarter of 2019 with complete integration being completed during third quarter of 2019.

Dorsey Metrology International is a leader in optical comparators and dimensional measurement hand tools. Its products are built in Poughkeepsie, New York, and its customer base ranges from small shops to Fortune 500 companies in almost every industry. Dorsey Metrology continues to innovate and improve its equipment based on user feedback and through constant engineering evolution. With the addition of S-T Industries optical lines, Dorsey is positioned to be one of the largest optical comparator suppliers in the United States.

MIT News’s picture

By: MIT News

(MIT News: Cambridge, MA) -- MIT researchers have devised a technique that reverse engineers complex 3D computer-aided design (CAD) models, making them far easier for users to customize for manufacturing and 3D printing applications.

Nearly all commercial products start as a CAD file, a 2D or 3D model with the product’s design specifications. One method that’s widely used to represent today’s 3D models is constructive solid geometry (CSG), a technique where numerous basic shapes, or “primitives,” with a few adjustable parameters can be assembled in various ways to form a single object. When finalized, the compiled digital object is converted to a mesh of 3D triangles that defines the object’s shape. These meshes are used as input for many applications, including 3D printing and virtual simulation.

Customizing that mesh, however, is no easy task. For example, adjusting the radius in one portion of the object requires individually tweaking the vertices and edges of each affected triangle. With complex models comprising thousands of triangles, customization becomes daunting and time consuming. Traditional techniques to convert triangle meshes back into shapes don’t scale well to complex models or work accurately on low-resolution, noisy files.

Rob Matheson’s picture

By: Rob Matheson

Imagine a world where smartphones, laptops, wearables, and other electronics are powered without batteries. Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have taken a step in that direction, with the first fully flexible device that can convert energy from wi-fi signals into electricity that could power electronics.

Devices that convert AC electromagnetic waves into DC electricity are known as “rectennas.” The researchers demonstrate a new kind of rectenna, described in a study appearing in Nature today, that uses a flexible radio-frequency (RF) antenna that captures electromagnetic waves—including those carrying wi-fi—as AC waveforms.

The antenna is then connected to a novel device made out of a two-dimensional semiconductor just a few atoms thick. The AC signal travels into the semiconductor, which converts it into a DC voltage that could be used to power electronic circuits or recharge batteries.

In this way, the battery-free device passively captures and transforms ubiquitous wi-fi signals into useful DC power. Moreover, the device is flexible and can be fabricated in a roll-to-roll process to cover very large areas.

NewTek Sensor Solutions’s picture

By: NewTek Sensor Solutions

(NewTek: Pennsauken, NJ) -- NewTek Sensor Solutions introduces the MBB Series of ultra-precision dimensional gaging probes engineered for highly accurate and repeatable measurement of dimensional parameters in a variety of quality control, industrial metrology, and inspection equipment applications.

Offering excellent linearity, great precision, and infinite resolution, these spring-loaded AC LVDTs (linear variable differential transformers) are ideal for use in roundness measurements, automotive testing, metal component gaging, and materials testing.

The MBB Series gaging LVDT probes feature a stainless-steel probe assembly and 8 mm diameter housing protected to IP-65. High-precision linear ball bearings provide for smooth probe movement with excellent repeatability and without stiction. Incorporating a linear ball bearing assembly fitted to a nonrotating probe shaft, the MBB Series gaging probes produce an output voltage linearly proportional to the probe’s shaft position with minimal radial play. The use of an AC-operated LVDT for probe-shaft displacement reduces errors due to friction, resulting in a highly precise measurement of the position of a target surface.

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