Phillips Precision Inc.’s picture

By: Phillips Precision Inc.

(Phillips Precision’s Products Division: Boylston, MA) -- Phillips Precision announces its Sturdy Lever Clamp as part of the Inspection Arsenal, the first universal fixturing system providing a complete set of tools for all inspections. 

The heavy-duty Sturdy Lever cantilevered clamp is ideal for added force and for larger parts. The lever tightens with a thumb screw, rather than downward force, which makes this clamp less likely to mar the part. The clamp generates up to 30 pounds of force and can be adjusted to hold at a steep angle if needed. It works on the same post as Phillip Precision’s Trigger-Finger hold-down. The post is steel, and the clamp lever is black-anodized aluminum (thumb-screw included). The Sturdy Lever clamp can be ordered with a ¼–20 or M6 threaded post. It assembles quickly and self-aligns/levels to the correct starting point. 

Sturdy Lever Clamp by Phillips Precision

Wiley’s picture

By: Wiley

(Wiley: Hoboken, NJ) -- Scaling a business is not for the faint of heart. It’s a mind-bending journey that causes millions of business owners around the globe to either throw in the towel or avoid risk entirely and suffer from smallness and mediocrity.

Most of these businesses fail because they are ill-prepared to face the real challenges involved in scaling. Either they don’t have the bandwidth to keep up with the sales demand or production, miss out on major opportunities due to fear, or keep making the same mistakes again and again because systems and processes aren’t in sync with the rate of growth.

Scale or Fail by Allison Maslan

greenlight.guru’s picture

By: greenlight.guru

(Greenlight Guru: Indianapolis) -- Greenlight Guru, the only quality management software platform designed specifically for medical device companies, announces a new integration with Jira, creating an adaptive system for managing product development and post-market quality for devices with software elements.

Medical device design controls have historically been a top observation cited by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) during inspections, with many medical device companies struggling to demonstrate robust design controls via traditional spreadsheets or disconnected sets of documentation. With the growth of Software as a Medical Device (SaMD) applications, along with the proliferation of hardware-based devices now incorporating software or firmware elements, managing and maintaining design control traceability has become increasingly complex.

ISO’s picture

By: ISO

(ISO: Geneva) -- The number of management systems has risen dramatically in recent years, reflecting the needs and demands of more organizations looking to improve their performance across a wide range of areas and sectors. And most companies have more than one. The International Organization for Standardization’s (ISO) useful guide to integrating management system standards—whether they be from ISO or not—has just been updated.

From improving quality to energy efficiency, environmental performance, or even road traffic, the increasing use of management systems attests to progressively complex operating environments and contexts. The quest for continual improvement and sustained performance has prompted the need for a handbook to help guide organizations through effective management system design that is agile and integrated, to respond and grow.

Bruker Corp.’s picture

By: Bruker Corp.

(Bruker Nano Surfaces: San Jose, CA and Detroit) -- Bruker Nano Surfaces has announced a partnership with Greening Testing Laboratories of Detroit to provide convenient and cost-effective benchtop friction test and particle-screening capabilities to developers of friction materials. Under this partnership, Greening will leverage Bruker’s latest generation TriboLab Brake Material Screening Tester for measurement services, as well as for evaluating the tester for potential purchase.

ISO’s picture

By: ISO

(ISO: Geneva) -- New technologies, from robotics to machine learning, are ushering in a period of rapid change and development. While the aviation industry is working to reap the benefits of this industrial automation, standards, especially those of the International Organization for Standardization Technical Committee 184—“Automation systems and integration,” Subcommittee 4—“Industrial data” (ISO/TC 184/SC 4), will play a key role in ensuring a smooth flight path—but only if they can keep up.

Ever since Icarus boldly strapped on his wooden-framed wings made of feathers and wax and took to the skies, human beings have been defying gravity, designing and creating all kinds of contraptions and devices to get themselves airborne. Hubris, along with solar power, did it in for Icarus, but these days, the likes of Elon Musk, founder and chief designer of SpaceX and creator of Tesla, and Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon.com and Blue Origin, are blazing new trails in the skies, driven by their vision and a sense of adventure, and propelled by the new technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Matt Dumiak’s picture

By: Matt Dumiak

(CompliancePoint: Duluth, GA) -- It should come as no surprise to anyone that the California State Legislature has passed, and the California governor has signed, amendments to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). Having previously been a ballot initiative, one of the main drivers to get the CCPA passed as traditional legislation was to allow the law to go through the standard legislative process, as opposed to the previous ballot initiative that would have made the law difficult and arduous to amend.

First, the legislature gave the California attorney general some additional time to develop the implementing law as well as pushed back the enforcement date by up to six months, which will be no later than July 1, 2020, for now. Although the enforcement date could be set before July 1, 2020, we will have to wait and see when the regulation is implemented by the attorney general. Companies should be preparing to be compliant by Jan. 1, 2020, and be standing by for enforcement by July 1, 2020.

MIT News’s picture

By: MIT News

(MIT News: Cambridge, MA) -- A material designed by MIT chemical engineers can react with carbon dioxide from the air, to grow, strengthen, and even repair itself. The polymer, which might someday be used as construction or repair material or for protective coatings, continuously converts the greenhouse gas into a carbon-based material that reinforces itself.

The current version of the new material is a synthetic gel-like substance that performs a chemical process similar to the way plants incorporate carbon dioxide from the air into their growing tissues. The material might, for example, be made into panels of a lightweight matrix that could be shipped to a construction site, where they would harden and solidify just from exposure to air and sunlight, thereby saving on the energy and cost of transportation.

The finding is described in a paper in the journal Advanced Materials, by Professor Michael Strano, postdoc Seon-Yeong Kwak, and eight others at MIT and at the University of California at Riverside

RealWear’s picture

By: RealWear

(RealWear: Vancouver, WA) -- Colgate-Palmolive Co. has selected RealWear as its strategic provider of hands-free wearable computers for its industrial workforce. RealWear’s smart, voice-operated HMT-1 will be worn by hundreds of its mechanics and engineers across 20 of Colgate-Palmolive’s largest manufacturing facilities in 11 countries.

With the new technology, Colgate-Palmolive employees will be able to troubleshoot machinery while keeping their hands free to work and use their voice to engage with company subject matter experts (SMEs), equipment suppliers and manufacturing teams across sites for support and cross training. In addition, Colgate-Palmolive plans to use the devices to retrieve and capture documents and video.

“Colgate-Palmolive tested RealWear HMT-1 through successful pilots in eight locations and is now standardizing globally on this wearable device for our manufacturing operations,” says Warren Pruitt, vice president of global engineering at Colgate-Palmolive. “Looking ahead, we see an opportunity to use this tool beyond the plant floor for improved performance and new efficiencies.”

Intel’s picture

By: Intel

(Intel: Santa Clara, CA) -- Irene Petrick is the director of industrial innovation in the Industrial Solutions Division of Intel, and a member of Intel’s Internet of Things Group. Faith McCreary is a principal engineer, experience architect, researcher, and member of Intel’s Internet of Things Group. Petrick and McCreary came to Intel after careers in consulting, research, and academia. After they interviewed employees—from CEOs to factory workers—at 133 manufacturers, they co-authored a research paper on Industry 4.0. One key finding: 59 percent of people in manufacturing want “intelligent” solutions to take on work described as manual or labor-intensive.

How they would describe their work to a 10-year-old: “We imagine the factory of the future that is smart enough to take care of itself most of the time,” McCreary says.

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