Content By Michael Huda

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By: Michael Huda

We frequently get calls from customers who can’t figure out why their color measurements vary, even when they’re using maintained devices. Why would a sample read one way one day, then slightly different another? Many times the culprit is thermochromaticity, and it becomes an even bigger problem as the seasons change.

Michael Huda’s picture

By: Michael Huda

Color is our perception of reflected light across the visible spectrum. When light hits an object, it absorbs some rays and reflects others. The color of light that reflects back into our eyes is the color we perceive. The more light an object absorbs, the darker it appears.

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By: Michael Huda

Speaking the language of color isn’t like telling someone your name and expecting him to remember it. Our minds just don’t process color like that.

While vague color descriptions are sufficient for many people—“Turn left at the blue house” or “Choose the reddest strawberries”—if you work in an industry where color is important, you need to know how to speak a much more specific color language.

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By: Michael Huda

What happens to products when color goes wrong? It’s wrong color that keeps discount stores in business. Copy paper that isn’t quite bright enough, a label with the wrong color red, or a pillowcase that’s a shade off from the rest of the sheets, and the product is rejected. A discounter can buy the whole lot for a fraction of the cost and sell it for profit.