Content By Kelly Graves

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By: Kelly Graves

In my career as a business consultant, I’ve helped dozens of companies surface quality issues, develop managers as well as employees, build better trust and communication, transition ownership from one generation to the next, and unleash new levels of financial performance.

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By: Kelly Graves

In general, people hate confrontation and will do just about anything to distance themselves from it, but a manager owes it to her employees to overcome this fear and address problems directly and honestly. The key is knowing how to handle problems with employees, and knowing what will happen before it happens. In doing so one can be prepared ahead of time and not surprised.

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By: Kelly Graves

The following is an excerpt from Kelly Graves’ book, The Management and Employee Development Review (CRC Press, 2016).

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By: Kelly Graves

What are the common mistakes managers make when trying to motivate employees? In this article, we’ll discuss these mistakes and some better strategies to successfully motivate employees.

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By: Kelly Graves

An overwhelming majority of organizations have inadvertently created an “us vs. them” culture. They turn much of their focus and many of their resources away from serving the customer and instead direct them toward fighting one another and vying for power. Or they have given up and are just “doing time.” Losses are rarely caused by the economy or stiff competition; they are self-inflicted and mainly caused by infighting and various forms of conflict.

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By: Kelly Graves

Dave hadn’t been evaluated in 25 years, and neither had the other employees of this multimillion-dollar business. Things had gotten very loose with the company. Production targets weren’t being met, there was poor accountability and responsibility, and employees were arriving late and not calling in when “sick,” to name just a few.

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By: Kelly Graves

Three months ago I sat in a meeting with seven talented executives whom I’ve worked with on and off for five years. For the past two, there have been major undercurrents of friction between them during executive meetings. After attending a few of these, I noticed people were on their best “fake behavior” rather than having honest conversations about core problems such as miscommunication between departments, lack of accountability, and clear goals with precise timelines.

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By: Kelly Graves

What lasts longer, an expensive motivational speaker or a cup of espresso? It’s about the same, but the espresso provides a much better return on investment. You see, from a behavioral standpoint, you can’t motivate me, and I can’t motivate you. However, people can and do motivate themselves, and the steps outlined below will help managers to coach themselves and others.

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By: Kelly Graves

Most everyone has read the maxim, “Plan your work and work your plan.” This is simple and effective advice—when it’s followed. Unfortunately, it can also be overwhelming when it comes to ensuring that everyone in the organization knows what the strategic plan is and how they can directly support it. Executives assume that creating strategic plans will automatically transform their organization and people; however, that’s often not the case.

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By: Kelly Graves

In my last article, I presented the psychological steps of change and how to overcome the natural human resistance to it. In this installment, I’ll present an example of how to transfer those concepts into plans, the plans into actions, and the actions into continuous behaviors.