Content By Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

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By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

Not too long ago, my wife and I attended a fundraiser hosted by one local restaurateur on behalf of another. The locally owned and long-time eatery, Humpty Dumpty, in Grass Valley, California, had burned to the ground, obviously putting all its employees out of a job. So, the staff of Kane’s Restaurant and Maria’s Mexican Restaurant, both owned by John Kane, approached Kane and suggested a fundraiser where they would donate all their tips for one night to the out-of-work employees.

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By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

One of the more fascinating applications for large-volume 3-D scanning is in preserving our past. Sure, for those of you who work in the manufacturing or building industry, 3-D scanning is all about the future, making sure your product is in spec and performs properly going forward. But for those who work in historical preservation, 3-D scanning has given architects and preservationists a mighty tool in their arsenal, one that allows them to preserve, reconstruct, or resurrect heritage sites.

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By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

Donald J. Wheeler has been awarded the Deming Medal by the American Society for Quality (ASQ) for “the propagation of Dr. Deming’s ideas throughout the world through his numerous books and seminars on quality management and statistical quality improvement.” Here he answers some questions for Quality Digest Daily.

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By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

Yoshio Kondo, Ph.D., a quality management leader who stressed the interrelationship between quality and people, died April 1, 2011, at the age of 87.

According to professor Samuel Ho and Christopher Fung, Ph.D., authors of the TQM

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By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

Yoshio Kondo, Ph.D., a quality management leader who stressed the interrelationship between quality and people, died April 1, 2011, at the age of 87.

According to professor Samuel Ho and Christopher Fung, Ph.D., authors of the TQM

Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

 

Forty or 50 years ago, when you sat down in front of, or picked up, a dimensional measurement tool, you immediately recognized that a certain amount of knowledge and skill was required to use it. The measurement operation was almost always completely manual, and even reading and interpreting the readings was an acquired skill. In addition, it was largely understood that precise measurements needed to be taken in a controlled environment on a stable surface. A skilled measurement specialist was half engineer, half craftsman (or half Houdini).

Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

 

Forty or 50 years ago, when you sat down in front of, or picked up, a dimensional measurement tool, you immediately recognized that a certain amount of knowledge and skill was required to use it. The measurement operation was almost always completely manual, and even reading and interpreting the readings was an acquired skill. In addition, it was largely understood that precise measurements needed to be taken in a controlled environment on a stable surface. A skilled measurement specialist was half engineer, half craftsman (or half Houdini).

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By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

During the last couple of decades we have seen huge advances in laser trackers, portable arms, structured light scanners, laser scanners, photogrammetry devices, and other 3-D measurement technologies that have made accurate 3-D shop floor measurement more feasible than ever before. Each of these technologies has its own set of tradeoffs—accuracy, measuring volume, portability, durability, or ease of use—but the clincher for many small machine shops has been the price.

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By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

President Obama’s proposed budget for fiscal year 2011, which begins in October, includes funds to keep the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program (BPEP) ticking over, after a fashion, for another year. The $7.7 million currently on the table is less than the $9.9 million he requested and $1.9 million less than last year’s appropriations. This leaves the BPEP in the increasingly prevalent quandary of taking care of business with a tightened belt.

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By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

One of the laments we hear quite frequently in the manufacturing sector is the lack of skilled employees available in the hiring pool. In the age of high-definition video games, social networking, and phones that have more capability than your five-year-old laptop, it's no wonder that manufacturing looks a little boring to today’s youth.