Content By Scott Berkun

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By: Scott Berkun

Are engineers more creative than designers? Both answers (“Yes they are!” and, “No they are not!”) are naïve. It’s foolish to compare massive groups of people against each other, especially around a sloppy word like creativity.

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By: Scott Berkun

To ask a good question requires two things: insight and gumption. The root of all worthy questions is a desire to fill in a gap in your understanding of something. The insight in good questions comes from seeing that gap, exploring its edges, and forming a question that can serve as an invitation to others to fill. But a question can’t ask itself. You need gumption, or the courage to ask the question of someone. Many people have good questions but never find the courage to speak up and share them.

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By: Scott Berkun

The great surprise for people with good ideas is the gap between how an idea feels in their minds and how it feels when they try to put the idea to work.

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By: Scott Berkun

On Tuesdays I write about the top-voted question on “Ask Berkun.” This week’s question came from J.R., who wrote: “What is a favorite theory that you wish more people understood?”

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By: Scott Berkun

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By: Scott Berkun

Many of our most popular stories of discovery are portrayed as accidents or matters of luck. We love these stories because they make creativity seem easy and fun. Nevertheless, they are misleading.

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By: Scott Berkun

The first industrial revolution may have been the most dramatic we will ever have. This is an unpopular notion because we suffer from what Tom Standage called “chronocentrism,” which is the belief that the present is the most amazing time ever in history, and our inventions will transform the world like nothing before. I don’t believe that. I don’t think you will, either, if you think about it for a minute.

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By: Scott Berkun

The worst, and most common, way to try to make people think is to use force. When people ask the question, “How can I make people think?” they usually mean, “How can I get other people to think the way I do?” They don’t precisely want more people to think well, since free thinking is unpredictable. Instead, they really want submission, and the way you get submission is by force.

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By: Scott Berkun

Status quo is a powerful beast. No matter the organization, once people are in powerful roles they tend to want to change as little as possible out of fear of losing that power. Despite all of their rhetoric about progress and change, most bosses are hard to convince to try new things.