Content By Dave K. Banerjea

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By: Dave K. Banerjea

In most industries, maintenance and calibration management departments are separate operations that rarely, if ever cross paths. However, in some industries, such as pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturing, maintenance and calibrations are often performed on the same assets. As a result, some developers of maintenance and calibration management software have responded by combining the two functions into a single application for both traditional on-premise installations as well as hosted (or cloud) solutions.

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By: Dave K. Banerjea

Story update 4/24/2014: We bumped up the cost of accreditation based on comments that the original article was on the low side. We also added references to ILAC as well as additional accreditation bodies that operate in the United States (ACLASS, NVLAP, L.A.B.)

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By: Dave K. Banerjea

Calibrating measurement and test equipment (M&TE) is expensive, but using equipment that is out of calibration can be even more costly. Faulty M&TE will produce suspect parts, and once you've discovered that your M&TE is the problem, you’ll have to screen the suspect parts and repair or scrap the parts that aren’t in spec. If you’ve already shipped the parts to a customer, you may have to recall them.

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By: Dave K. Banerjea

Like so many other business software applications, calibration management software has evolved from simple beginnings as a digital index-card system that reminded operators when their instrument and tool calibrations were due. During the past 25 years, these systems have matured and are more comprehensive, analytical, scalable, and secure, and have moved from traditional desktop software, to web-based, hosted, and mobile.

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By: Dave K. Banerjea

When we think about gauge calibration management, we usually think of the actual calibration process: sending the gauge to the calibration lab, comparing it to a traceable measurement standard, making changes to the gauge to bring it into the calibration range, entering the calibration results into a software database, attaching the calibration label, and then putting it back into circulation.

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By Dave K. Banerjea

If your company is involved in manufacturing, chances are that a good portion of your company's assets include measurement and test equipment (M&TE). This includes everything from simple go/no-go plug gauges to air-pressure gauges, voltmeters, micrometers and calipers on up to very sophisticated equipment such as robotic coordinate measurement machines and scanning electron microscopes.