Content By David L. Chandler

David L. Chandler’s picture

By: David L. Chandler

A team of engineers has built and tested a radically new kind of airplane wing, assembled from hundreds of tiny identical pieces. The wing can change shape to control the plane’s flight, and could provide a significant boost in aircraft production, flight, and maintenance efficiency, the researchers say.

David L. Chandler’s picture

By: David L. Chandler

Applying just a bit of strain to a piece of semiconductor or other crystalline material can deform the orderly arrangement of atoms in its structure enough to cause dramatic changes in its properties, such as the way it conducts electricity, transmits light, or conducts heat.

Now, a team of researchers at MIT and in Russia and Singapore have found ways to use artificial intelligence to help predict and control these changes, potentially opening up new avenues of research on advanced materials for future high-tech devices.

David L. Chandler’s picture

By: David L. Chandler

Photo: Greg Hren/RLE

Researchers at MIT have succeeded in making a fine thread that functions as a diode, a device at the heart of modern electronics.

David L. Chandler’s picture

By: David L. Chandler

It seems like a no-brainer: Remanufacturing products rather than making new ones from scratch—widely done with everything from retread tires to refilled inkjet cartridges to remanufactured engines—should save a lot of energy, right?

Not so fast, says a new study by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

In some cases, the conventional wisdom is indeed correct.

David L. Chandler’s picture

By: David L. Chandler

In a finding that has met with surprise and some controversy in the scientific community, researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and elsewhere have discovered a basic property that governs the way water and many other liquids behave as their temperature changes.

David L. Chandler’s picture

By: David L. Chandler

You can check a person’s vital signs—pulse, respiration, and blood pressure—manually or by attaching sensors to the body. But a student in the Harvard-Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Health and Sciences Technology program is working on a system that could measure these health indicators just by putting a person in front of a low-cost camera such as a laptop computer’s built-in webcam.