Content By Forrest Breyfogle—New Paradigms

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By: Forrest Breyfogle—New Paradigms

A report of how a process performs is not only a function of process characteristics and sampling chance differences. It can also depend on sampling approach. For example, one person could describe a process as out of control, which would lead to activities that address process perturbations as abnormalities; another person could describe the same process as being in control.

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By: Forrest Breyfogle—New Paradigms

I will first describe how long-lasting business metrics can be created at the business level and then illustrate the 30,000-foot-level scorecard tracking of these measurements, where an individuals control chart is used to determine process stability. Then I will show how to make a prediction statement, if a process has a recent region of stability.  

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By: Forrest Breyfogle—New Paradigms

I n my February column, "Avoiding Company Decline," I described how part of a corporation's economic slide could be attributed to organizational scorecards or dashboards because they are often ineffective in promoting the most appropriate behaviors. In this column, I will show how creating and executing strategic planning statements also can contribute to a company's decline.

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By: Forrest Breyfogle—New Paradigms

In one section of the January 25, 2012, Wall Street Journal, several articles pointed to an underlying dysfunction in companies from diverse industries. Although they offered different products and services, they all had one thing in common: Employees may have been working their hardest, but their management systems weren’t doing their jobs.

Here are the articles:

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By: Forrest Breyfogle—New Paradigms

Organizations need a systematic approach for risk containment when quality, delivery, and design product and service issues occur. Such a system should also help them to recover quickly from errant decisions made by executives, operations personnel, and the quality department.

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By: Forrest Breyfogle—New Paradigms

Story update 11/13/2011: The references at the end of this article were inadvertently deleted during final editing. They have been restored.

Forrest Breyfogle—New Paradigms’s picture

By: Forrest Breyfogle—New Paradigms

Lean, lean Six Sigma, total quality management (TQM), and other techniques have helped companies improve processes through the execution of projects. However, much of these efforts have resulted in siloed process improvements that don't benefit the enterprise as a whole.

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By: Forrest Breyfogle—New Paradigms

S
ix Sigma and lean provide tools for process improvement. Most of today’s business improvement programs can trace their roots back to a lean or a Six Sigma heritage. In general, these process improvement methodologies are considered advances from total quality management (TQM) and other methods from the 1970s and 1980s.

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By: Forrest Breyfogle—New Paradigms

The financials of an enterprise are a result of the integration and interaction of its processes, not of individual procedures in isolation. Using a whole-system perspective, one realizes that the output of a system is a function of its weakest link or constraint. If you're not careful, you can be focusing on a subsystem that, even though improved, doesn't affect the system's overall big-picture output.

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By: Forrest Breyfogle—New Paradigms

The balanced scorecard is a commonly used vehicle that is to align organizational-chart work efforts to executive-determined strategies and goals.  With this approach, strategic planning could be considered as step one in this overall business-management-system process.