Content By Quality Digest

Rohit Mathur’s picture

By: Rohit Mathur

Whatever the process or type of data collected, all data display variation. This is also true in software development. Any measure or parameter of interest to our business will vary from time period to time period, e.g., number of incidents per week or month, time taken in resolving incidents, number of tickets encountered in a production support environment per month, and defect density in code.

Understanding variation is about being able to describe the behavior of processes or systems over time. This variation can be stable, predictable, and routine, or unstable, unpredictable, and exceptional. Being able to distinguish between stable or common-cause variation, and unstable or special-cause variation, helps us to decide the type of action needed to improve the process. The control chart, developed by Walter Shewhart, is the tool that enables us to do so.

Quality Digest Live -- July 12, 2019

QDL for July 12, 2019

This week we talk with Tom Taormina, author of It Was Rocket Science, about what it really takes to deliver quality products and service. Hint: It's not about using the right quality tools.

Also, we'll look at Q-Mark's interactive CMM-probe design tool.
Be sure to subscribe to Q-Mark's YouTube channel

 

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ZEISS technologies help iMark ensure trusted molding processes

iMARK Molding, in Woodville, Wisconsin, inspects their injection molded parts with several ZEISS systems including the multisensor O-INSPECT 322, the CONTURA CMM and the METROTOM 800 with X-ray technology. See how iMARK uses CALYPSO software for several ZEISS technologies.

ZEISS technologies help iMark ensure trusted molding processes

iMARK Molding, in Woodville, Wisconsin, inspects their injection molded parts with several ZEISS systems including the multisensor O-INSPECT 322, the CONTURA CMM and the METROTOM 800 with X-ray technology. See how iMARK uses CALYPSO software for several ZEISS technologies.

ZEISS technologies help iMark ensure trusted molding processes
 

Zeiss 07-15-19 F Video Banner

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

Ordinarily, you won’t encounter a radiation thermometer until somebody puts one in your ear at the doctor’s office, or you point one at your forehead when you’re feeling feverish. But more sophisticated and highly calibrated, research-grade “noncontact” thermometers—which measure the infrared (heat) radiation given off by objects without touching them—are critically important to many endeavors besides healthcare.

However, even high-end conventional radiation thermometers have produced readings with worryingly large uncertainties. But now researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have invented a portable, remarkably stable, standards-quality radiation thermometer about 60 cm (24 in.) long that is capable of measuring temperatures to a precision of within a few thousandths of a degree Celsius.

Nextsense’s picture

By: Nextsense

(NEXTSENSE: Graz, Austria) -- Continuous monitoring of rolling and drawing mill production has become a critical factor in the steel industry. To keep costs for quality control at bay measurement expert NEXTSENSE developed an affordable profile measurement system, ATON Wire, applicable for long products with round cross-section, like wires, bars and tubes.

There is a vast array of applications for the ATON Wire in your steel mill and most of them are focused on optimizing costs for you. Monitoring dimensional accuracy over the entire coil length allows you to instantaneously inspect and deal with faulty products, thus increasing your product quality standards. Checking roll and die wear will make roll and die changes plannable. Using on-line measurement reduces the time for product changes. Eliminating sample cutting will reduce waste and therefore material costs. Furthermore, full documentation of the whole production process is ensured.

Create account from gated

Create account from gated

Barrett Thompson’s picture

By: Barrett Thompson

A hot topic of conversation for many B2B industrial companies is the talent and skills gap due to the generational shift in the workforce from baby boomers to millennials. According to Ben Willmott, head of public policy at the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, “Too many employers are sleepwalking toward a significant skills problem that risks derailing their business strategy if not addressed. Not enough organizations are thinking strategically about workforce planning or even enough about the make-up of their workforce.”

Generational skills gap causing a quality gap

Recruiting and retaining millennials for sales teams is often cited as a primary concern. As baby boomers retire and exit the workforce, decades of quality experience, product, and market knowledge leave as well. Loss of quality is often the impact of this workforce transition on sales teams.

Quality Digest Live -- July 5, 2019

QDL for July 5, 2019

This week: The dead end job

Is it possible to find peace and even prosper under grueling circumstances. Our guest today, Kelly Graves, CEO of Internal Business Solutions, and author of The Management and Employee Development Review, believes there is.

 

 

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