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By: Quality Digest

A joint committee of the American National Standards Institute and the American Industrial Hygiene Association recently released a draft Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems (OHSMS) standard for public review.

The deadline to submit comments on the proposal is Oct. 15. ANSI established Accredited Standards Committee Z10, with the AIHA as its secretariat, when the work on the draft standard began in 1999. The committee drew from many established international standards when writing the OHSMS standard.

“The committee examined current national and international standards, guidelines and practices in the occupational, environmental and quality systems arena,” the committee reports in the draft. “They adapted the principles most relevant from these approaches into a standard that is compatible with the principal international standards as well as with management system approaches currently in use in the United States.”

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By: Quality Digest

The recent acquisition of Quality Certification Bureau Inc. by QMI made QMI the largest registrar in North America, according to the registrar.

The buy-out includes QCB Inc., QBC Corp., and QCB Organic, companies that are collectively based in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. QMI reports it now has more than 10,700 registrations serviced by more than 400 employees.

Customers will notice little change as the companies are merged, QMI reports. “QMI and QCB have built strong reputations both here and abroad as respected registrars providing premier customer service,” says Wendy Tilford, QMI president. “Acquisition is a significant element of our growth strategy and QCB is an excellent fit.”

For more information, visit www.qmi.com.

Denise Robitaille’s picture

By: Denise Robitaille

Perhaps the single most pervasive reason top management resists the implementation of a quality management system relates to our failure, as quality professionals, to demonstrate the return on investment. We do a less-than-stellar job of demonstrating to executives the financial value implicit in ISO 9001:2000 or any of the other excellent QMS models.

Our linguistic inflection stresses the “quality” and downplays the “management.” Inadvertently, we end up de-emphasizing the role managers play in the strategic implementation of a QMS.

A good QMS helps an organization reach its goals. Those goals universally relate to satisfying customer requirements to make money. For nonprofits, the net gain produced by satisfying customer requirements might be reflected in such monetary benefits as reduced tax burden due to decreased dependencies on community resources.

The challenge for quality professionals is to sell top management on the financial benefits of ISO 9001—or whatever model is appropriate to that industry. We need to be able to say, with conviction, “If we implement this system, we will help our bottom line.” We need to show them the money.

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By: Quality Digest

Lockheed Martin Corp. announced it will buy a coordinate measuring machine (CMM) and laser scanner from Leica Geosystems Inc. for use in its Forth Worth, Texas, headquarters.

Under the terms of the contract, Leica’s metrology division will deliver an LR200 laser scanner (which combines radar, laser and 3-D software technologies) with a wireless T-Probe CMM. Lockheed uses laser tracking systems to demonstrate its F-35 Joint Strike Fighter aircraft modules and mating concepts as well as measuring and inspect assembly tooling details based on CAD models.

Leica’s LR200 delivers scan rates up to 1,000 points per second at distances up to 48 m, with accuracy up to 20 µm. It can also capture single point-to-point measurements and scan reflectorless surfaces like a green laser. Leica’s hand-held T-Probe CMM will be implemented with the LTD800/700 laser tracker series and enables the operator to capture 3-D data in a flexible manner.

For more information, visit www.leica-geosystems.com/metrology.

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By: Quality Digest

Delcam Inc. is offering a free CAD viewer that will allow users to view CAD models in all the major formats, including CATIA versions 4 and 5, Pro/Engineer 2001 and Wildfire, SDRC, Unigraphics, SolidWorks and Solid Edge, as well as other industry standards.

“Even though modern CAD software can produce incredibly realistic 2-D images of new designs, the ability to view a 3-D models is still more valuable for potential suppliers, distributors and customers,” says Peter Dickin, Delcam marketing manager. “With our free viewing software, there will be no limit on the number of collaborators to which companies will be able to distribute models of new design proposals.”

He adds that the offering will allow the fastest possible feedback from everyone involved in the delivery of new concepts into the marketplace. Early involvement by collaborators will help establish consensus on the proposed design, minimizing the number of changes that need to be made during the latter stages of product development.

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By: Quality Digest

FARO Technologies Inc. recently released an enhanced generation of its popular laser trackers.

Highlights of the new trackers include ADM Smart Auto-Adjust, which improves accuracy by automatically adapting to conditions affecting measurement drift; Fast Laser Lock, which re-locks the laser in less than a minute for maximum portability; and Advanced Target Search, which has been modified to handle multiple target types of varying intensity.

“The new technology is very thorough,” says Chuck Pfeffer, laser product manager. “It never missed a target during our extensive testing.”

The device’s existing SuperADM and SelfCom technology make the enhancements even more useful. “The latest advances demonstrate our ability to make great products even better, which allows our customers to do the same for their products and processes,” says Simon Raab, FARO president and CEO

For more information, visit www.faro.com.

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By: Quality Digest

A partnership between Arc Second Inc. and Romer CimCore could signal the acceptance of indoor GPS as the measurement technology of the future.

Several major metrology companies, including Romer CimCore, Metrologic Inc. and New River Kinematics, showcased Arc Second’s GPS technology at the 2004 Coordinate Metrology Systems Conference, held in San Jose, California, in August.

By providing a factorywide coordinate frame, Arc Second enables providers of robotic systems, measurement instruments, material handling equipment and other devices the freedom to move about the factory. With indoor GPS, awkward and unwieldy approaches to leapfrogging are becoming a thing of the past.

For more information, visit www.arcsecond.com.

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By: Quality Digest

The revised ISO 14001 standard is scheduled to be published by the end of the year, meaning significant changes to environmental management professionals.

According to the International Organization for Standardization, the changes to the standard aim to clarify it and make it more user-friendly. Additionally, it aligns some clauses with ISO 9001:2000. Among the proposed changes are:

Praveen Gupta’s picture

By: Praveen Gupta

Six Sigma has been well applied in manufacturing through improving processes that use the DMAIC methodology. Some larger corporations have integrated Six Sigma so well into the corporate culture that it can be considered the DNA of the company. However, even in such companies, the human resources department has been practic ally untouched by Six Sigma. In a recent conference of the human resources professionals in Chicago, it was clear that HR people are now looking to benefit from Six Sigma initiatives. Two of the questions that have been asked are, “How does HR implement Six Sigma?,” and “What can HR do to help Six Sigma initiatives in an organization?”

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By: Quality Digest

Textron Inc. recently announced two promotions within its Six Sigma department.

Peter Riley was promoted to senior vice president of Six Sigma, integrated supply chain and transformation. In addition, John Mayers was appointed to the position of vice president of Six Sigma. Both men will serve on Textron’s transformation leadership team, which comprises the company’s top 21 executives.

“These appointments reflect the progress we’ve made in cultivating our leadership bench strength, truly representing the essence of our talent development and mobility initiatives,” says Lewis B. Campbell, Textron chairman and CEO.

Riley holds a degree in engineering and is a Six Sigma Black Belt. Mayers most recently served as executive vice president of Six Sigma for Textron Financial Corp. He holds degrees from Purdue University.

For more information, visit www.textron.com.