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Buyer's Guide for Quality Management Software

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Buyer's Guide for Quality Management Software
 

Tom Taormina’s picture

By: Tom Taormina

Each article in this series presents new tools for increasing return on investment (ROI), enhancing customer satisfaction, creating process excellence, and driving risk from an ISO 9001:2015-based quality management system (QMS). They will help implementers evolve quality management to overall business management. In this article we look at the clauses and subclauses of Section 9 of the standard.

Clause 9—Performance evaluation

Clause 9 is the part of the standard that we can use to truly quantify business excellence and risk avoidance. I will propose paradigm shifts that will make the outputs of this clause more informative for senior management and will include actionable recommendations that can contribute to the success factors that are immediately palatable and implementable for the leadership.

9.1.1 Monitoring, measurement, analysis, and evaluation—General

9.1.1 and excellence
This subclause requires that the organization must establish what needs to be monitored, measured, analyzed, and evaluated.

Douglas S. Thomas’s picture

By: Douglas S. Thomas

The cyber world is relatively new, and unlike other types of assets, cyber-assets are potentially accessible to criminals in far-off locations. This distance provides the criminal with significant protections from getting caught; thus, the risks are low, and with cyber-assets and activities being in the trillions of dollars, the payoff is high.

When we talk about cybercrime, we often focus on the loss of privacy and security. But cybercrime also results in significant economic losses. Yet the data and research on this aspect of cybercrime are unfortunately limited. Data collection often relies on small sample sizes or has other challenges that bring accuracy into question.

Marposs’s picture

By: Marposs

(Marposs: Auburn Hills, MI) -- Marposs, a world leader in measurement, inspection, and test technologies, has announced its new Artis GEMGP stand-alone solution for detecting process anomalies during metal cutting in machine tools. By measuring force and strain, GEMGP is able to detect and report on tool breakage, missing tools, overload, tool wear, and fluid flow in real time. This helps to prevent damage to the machine, reduce scrap, and improve productivity.

The GEMGP can accommodate two sensors for measuring force and strain values obtained from the spindle during the machining process. A highly flexible solution, the GEMGP offers three different monitoring strategies and can handle up to 127 different cutting cycles with varying types of limits for each cycle. Any events that exceed the pre-fixed limits are recorded in a log file.

The compact GEMGP is designed for easy installation and operation and can be housed within machine electrical cabinets, robots, handling systems, or other devices. All necessary functions and interfaces are integrated in the module. Featuring a digital I/O interface, the GEMGP is independent of the NC type and can be run from any PLC, enabling a discrete connection to the module.

Ben Brumfield’s picture

By: Ben Brumfield

Dang robots are crummy at so many jobs, and they tell lousy jokes to boot. In two new studies, these were common biases human participants held toward robots.

The studies were originally intended to test for gender bias, that is, if people thought a robot believed to be female may be less competent at some jobs than a robot believed to be male and vice versa. The studies’ titles even included the words “gender,” “stereotypes,” and “preference,” but researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology discovered no significant sexism against the machines.

“This did surprise us,” says Ayanna Howard, the principal investigator in both studies. “There was only a very slight difference in a couple of jobs but not significant. There was, for example, a small preference for a male robot over a female robot as a package deliverer.” Howard is a professor in and the chair of Georgia Tech’s School of Interactive Computing.

Although robots are not sentient, as people increasingly interface with them, we begin to humanize the machines. Howard studies what goes right as we integrate robots into society and what goes wrong, and much of both has to do with how the humans feel about robots.

Willow Ascenzo’s picture

By: Willow Ascenzo

During the late 19th century, Wilhelm Röntgen discovered X-rays and soon after discovered their properties for medical and industrial imaging when he created a radiograph of his wife’s hand. From this discovery, the powerful tool of X-ray radiography and tomography fell into the hands of medical professionals and industrial materials professionals.

Several decades later, during the 1930s, James Chadwick discovered the neutron, an electrically-neutral particle that resides in an atom’s nucleus. Soon afterward, the neutron was also recognized as a potential powerful tool for industrial radiography, just like X-rays.

As the technology behind X-ray imaging advanced and X-ray sources became more plentiful, X-radiography became more widely used in the field of nondestructive testing, and exhaustive quality standards were set in place to ensure that the use of this tool led to standardized and consistent results. The development of, and adherence to, these standards have helped push X-ray imaging along, leading to the development of both digital radiography, as opposed to film, and computed tomography as a powerful expansion of planar radiography into the third dimension.

Ryan Ayers’s picture

By: Ryan Ayers

Data are valuable assets, so much so that they are the world’s most valuable resource. That makes understanding the different types of data—and the role of a data scientist—more important than ever. In the business world, more companies are trying to understand big numbers and what they can do with them. Expertise in data is in high demand. Determining the right data and measurement scales enables companies to organize, identify, analyze, and ultimately use data to inform strategies that will allow them to make a genuine impact.

Data at the highest level: qualitative and quantitative

What are data? In short, they are a collection of measurements or observations, divided into two different types: qualitative and quantitative.

Gleb Tsipursky’s picture

By: Gleb Tsipursky

As a vast number of companies rush to reopen, they’re falling into the trap of “getting back to normal.” They don’t realize that we’re heading into a period of waves of restrictions, due to many states reopening too soon. Indeed, some of the states that opened early have already reimposed some restrictions.

As I predicted back at the start of the pandemic, we will be facing recurring restrictions and shutdowns, and need to focus much more on virtual interactions. To survive and thrive in this new abnormal, and avoid the trap of normalcy, leaders need to understand the parallels between what’s going on now and what happened at the start of the pandemic.

Harry Hertz’s picture

By: Harry Hertz

Communities across America have long struggled with systemic issues, such as education disparities, income inequality, access to healthcare, diversity and inclusion, and inequalities in economic opportunity. When these issues are addressed, they are generally addressed in silos without the benefit of a comprehensive framework for proactive intra-community collaboration.

In 2013, Communities of Excellence 2026 was formed as a nonprofit organization with the purpose of helping communities work together using a Baldrige-based, community-centric framework. The goal is to achieve communities of excellence across America by the 250th anniversary of our country in 2026. To date, three learning collaboratives, involving 18 communities across the United States, have been established.

US map showing all 18 communities from 2017-2020.
Click image for larger view.