Content By Quality Digest

L.S. Starrett Co.’s picture

By: L.S. Starrett Co.

(The L.S. Starrett Co: Athol, MA) -- The L.S. Starrett Co., a leading global manufacturer of precision hand tool gauges, a broad range of force testing solutions, metrology equipment, and more, has introduced a flexible selection architecture that enables the range of Starrett force and material testing software programs to be compatible with its different test frame series. This interchangeable system architecture increases application versatility, providing users a wider range of solution options from basic to advanced, for their specific force and material testing needs.

Starrett L2, S2, L2 Plus, and L3 software are now compatible and interchangeable with all Starrett frame/stands series (FMM, FMS, FMD, MMS, MMD). In addition, Starrett L1 and S1 software is compatible with FMM Series frames.

Miriam Boudreaux’s picture

By: Miriam Boudreaux

If you are wondering whether your organization could benefit from formal root cause analysis (RCA) and corrective action training, read on to see if any of these issues are present in your day-to-day operations. RCA and corrective actions are some of the most useful tools for continual improvement.

Here’s why you should include them among your company’s (and all employees’) tool set.

1. High number of NCRs in your company

It’s true that the number of nonconformance reports (NCRs) will depend on the volume of operations a specific company has. Therefore, the “number” of NCRs is a relative figure. However, if you know you have a high number of NCRs, the issue may be that you are not performing effective RCA and corrective action.

L.S. Starrett Co.’s picture

By: L.S. Starrett Co.

(The L.S. Starrett Co.: Athol, MA) -- The L.S. Starrett Co., a global manufacturer of precision measuring tools and gauges, metrology systems, and more, announces it will be featuring metrology and force measurement solutions with automation capabilities, as well as a wide range of precision measuring tools and gauges, at MD&M West in booth No. 4530 in the Automation Technology Expo (ATX) located at the Anaheim Convention Center in Anaheim, California, Feb. 11–13, 2020.

Starrett video-based measurement systems combine high-resolution images, powerful intuitive software, and precision mechanical platforms to deliver superb accuracy and repeatable measurement results for medical manufacturers’ precision measurement applications. The Starrett HDV300 Horizontal Digital Video Comparator, which combines the best features of vision and optical comparator technology, will be demonstrated.

The HDV300 has a uniquely designed interchangeable lens mounting system, go/no-go digital overlay capability directly from part CAD files, real-time video edge detection and more. Video edge detection allows real-time interaction of the imported file with the video image of the part being inspected.

Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

What a year.

No matter your job, your industry, or your political beliefs, this year has been a heck of a ride. The (still ongoing) trade war with China, manufacturing gains (and losses), the 737 MAX, Hong Kong riots, North Korea, Brexit, impeachment. What a mixed bag of ups and downs that has influenced all aspects of our life. Including our work. (For insight on how our editorial director deals with all this on a personal level, read her op-ed here.)

But on a workaday level, we each continue to do our job as best we can. That’s what we are paid to do. We take pride in the product or service we provide and try our best to deliver what our customers want when they want it, despite what turmoil swirls around us. And quality professionals are critical to that effort. Whether you are an inspector, auditor, calibration tech, metrologist, quality manager—or for most of our readers in small companies, all of those—the economy would suffer without the work you do to oversee quality. A robust economy is built in large part upon the quality of the products and services it produces.

Quality Digest’s default image

By: Quality Digest

As usual with Quality Digest’s diverse audience, this year’s top stories covered a wide range of topics applicable to quality professionals. From hardware to software, from standards to risk management, from China trade to FDA regulations. It’s always fun to see what readers gravitate to, and this year was no different.

Below are five articles that garnered a lot of interest from our readers. As you can see, the topics are quite diverse.

Improve Risk Management and Quality Across the Value Chain by Increasing Visibility
by Kelly Kuchinski

Jim Benson’s picture

By: Jim Benson

When we look at a Personal Kanban, its simplicity belies its power. Visualizing our work as individuals, as teams, and even as teams of teams creates trust, reliability, and understanding. When we want to coordinate work, these are serious prerequisites.

The image below is from a construction trailer, they are engaged in a lean construction exercise known as a “pull-plan.” Each color is a different contractor; each diamond is a delivery or a milestone. In this case we have five different contractors whose daily work relies on the completion of daily work done by the other contractors.

http://personalkanban.com/pk/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/InkedInkedIMG_20190821_102738_LI.jpg
A construction team planning work openly and honestly

To spell this out, their work directly relies on people in other companies, every day.

Historically, this had led to predictable delays as different companies worked at different speeds for different reasons. You might recognize this from different departments in your company or different people in your family. Our work often relies on other people who are often simply ignorant of our needs.

What's new with the Baldrige Program?

We talk with Robert Fangmeyer, director of the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program, about the latest developments in the Baldrige Program. Learn about this year's recipients, communities of excellence, redesigning the Baldridge evaluation process, and more.

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

A new research effort at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) aims to address a pervasive issue in our data-driven society: a lack of fairness that sometimes turns up in the answers we get from information retrieval software.

A measurably “fair search” would not always return the exact same list of answers to a repeated, identical query. Instead, the software would consider the relative relevance of the answers each time the search runs—thereby allowing different, potentially interesting answers to appear higher in the list at times.

Software of this type is everywhere, from popular search engines to less-known algorithms that help specialists comb through databases. This software usually incorporates forms of artificial intelligence that help it learn to make better decisions over time. But it bases these decisions on the data it receives, and if those data are biased in some way, the software will learn to make decisions that reflect that bias, too. These decisions can have real-world consequences—for instance, influencing which music artists a streaming service suggests, and whether you get recommended for a job interview.

NVision Inc.’s picture

By: NVision Inc.

It roamed Texas long before the first dinosaurs. Growing to 12 ft in length, with powerful jaws and specialized teeth for stabbing and tearing apart its prey, it was not a creature you’d want to encounter while on a Saturday morning hike. “It” was Dimetrodon limbatus, and a fossilized skeleton of the Paleozoic predator was recently scanned by NVision, a leader in 3D noncontact optical scanning/measurement, for the Texas Through Time museum in Hillsboro, Texas. The detailed scan data will enable the paleontology museum to 3D-print exact replicas of the fossil for further study and education.

Billed as the “Best Little Fossil Museum in Texas,” the nonprofit Texas Through Time was created by paleontologist Andre LuJan to preserve and promote the rich fossil history of the Lone Star State. Free to the public, the museum features a wide assortment of fossils from all ages and formations, including many one-of-a-kind fossils not available anywhere else. Although primarily focused on the noteworthy fossil diversity of Texas, the museum’s collection also includes fossils from around the world.

Nico Thomas’s picture

By: Nico Thomas

Earlier this year, the Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA), a part of the U.S. Department of Commerce, celebrated its 50th anniversary. The recognition is much deserved for an agency that has worked hard to strengthen minority-owned businesses. Through a network of centers and partners not unlike our own Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) National Network, the MBDA works with minority-owned businesses to create and retain jobs, build scale and capacity, and increase revenues. The drive to increase the competitiveness of underserved businesses by leveraging a network is something that connects the MBDA and the MEP program.