Content By Quality Digest

QDL Tech Corner: Olympus DSX1000 Digital Microscope

QDL for August 23, 2019

This week: A close look at the Olympus DSX1000 Digital Microscope

We look at a new digital microscope from Olympus. The DSX1000 boasts a 20–7,000X magnification range and the ability to instantly switch between six observation methods. A fast motorized optical zoom lets you optically zoom in and out by simply turning the dial on the console. Advanced algorithms enable you to capture high-resolution 3D images just by pushing a button.

 

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How To: Effectively Label Gages

Gages are found throughout manufacturing facilities. We discuss key identifiers that should be present on effective gage labels and stickers.

Formlabs 9-10-19 Webinar Link

Formlabs 9-10-19 Webinar Link

Andrei Vakulenko’s picture

By: Andrei Vakulenko

Taylor Attachments, based in the United Kingdom, custom designs and produces tractor headstock conversion brackets. These are attachments for farm handlers and loaders, for mounting everything from buckets to forks, grapples, saws, carriers, bale stabbers, grabbers, hitches, backhoes, tillers, yard scrapers, and more. Clients also send the company legacy equipment, which Taylor’s specialists precisely measure and reproduce using the latest materials and technology.

In the past at Taylor, this was a 100-percent manual process, which meant a busy 7 to 12 hours of making drawings using rulers and calipers, and pens and pencils to trace out parts and components on cardboard and paper, before creating mock-up prototypes for testing and secondary alterations.

The entire process entailed lots of cross-referencing and double-checking, and would take anywhere from seven days up to two or three weeks for each part. That’s the industry average. And it’s an inaccurate process, requiring lots of fine-tuning before each product is ready to be shipped to the client’s doorstep.

Exact Metrology’s picture

By: Exact Metrology

(Exact Metrology: Cincinnati) -- Exact Metrology, a leading provider of 3D and CT scanning equipment and metrology services, now offers the GOM CT scanner—the most accurate industrial CT scanner currently on the market. The GOM CT scanner offers the highest accuracy and highest resolution of any 225kV system available today, and Exact Metrology devised the “GOM CT Challenge” to prove this.

“If a company is considering the purchase of a CT scanner, they can call us and validate the suitability, then send us a part,” says Steve Young, co-president of Exact Metrology. “We’ll scan it and send them the images. If they don’t believe the output is superior to other scanners in the 225kV range, we’ll send them $100... no strings attached.”

For more details and an entry form, use this link https://www.exactmetrology.com/challenge.

If you have any questions regarding the GOM CT Challenge, call Steve Young from Exact Metrology at (513) 815-4491.

For more information on the GOM CT scanner, see https://www.exactmetrology.com/metrology-equipment/gom-ct-scanner.

DP Technology’s picture

By: DP Technology

Founded in St. Petersburg, Russia, in 2001, Green Tools is a leading manufacturer of cutting tools, providing circular saws and other woodcutting machines for the sawmill, furniture, and woodworking industries throughout Russia.

Green Tools began as a small reseller of woodworking tools produced by German tool-maker AKE. Over time though, the company progressed to manufacturing cutting tools of its own, moving from tool merchant to tool maker. As Kirill Smolin, technical consultant at Green Tools relates, At first we were a distributor of woodworking mills and saws produced at AKE factories in Germany while also providing tool sharpening services. Then we started to make tools ourselves on specialized machines that do not require a CAM [computer-aided manufacturing] system.


An array of cutting tools made by Green Tools

QDL: An Uber for Manufacturing?

QDL for August 16, 2019

We talk to Rigved Raut, founder of McPond, about connecting people who have machine-work but no machines with shops that have underutilized equipment. Plus: We look at probes and probe calibration spheres from Q-Mark

Be sure to subscribe to Q-Mark's YouTube channel.

 

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How To: Use CPK, and What Is It?

Master gages are vital to performing internal calibrations. What do you do when the master is found out of tolerance? We share tips and the beginnings of corrective actions that can be taken when a master gage failed its recent calibration.

Stephen McCarthy’s picture

By: Stephen McCarthy

In our constantly evolving, data-rich universe, collecting, interpreting, and understanding process data can be tricky. But it is increasingly important if we want to maintain sustainable quality across product development and manufacturing processes. This challenge is particularly evident in the life sciences arena, where pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device manufacturers constantly strive to build quality processes that deliver “fit for purpose” output.

Process data typically come from a collection of diverse sources in varying formats. These data are dynamic, which often means they have a short shelf life. The longer a piece of data sits, the greater chance that it loses relevancy. Data often are also coming from an extremely complex supply chain that may include development or manufacturing partners’ systems and processes.

Dat Duthinh’s picture

By: Dat Duthinh

One of the undergraduate engineering courses that left a deep and lasting impression on me was a course on innovation and aesthetics in engineering taught by David Billington at Princeton University. So, when I read the story of a skyscraper in New York that had to undergo secret emergency repairs because of a question from an engineering student in New Jersey, I knew that the student had to be one of Billington’s. And I knew then that I wanted to come back and investigate this issue in greater detail someday.

The award-winning, wedge-topped, 59-story Citicorp Building in Manhattan, now referred to as 601 Lexington Avenue, features striking columns in the middle of its four sides rather than its corners. This remarkable configuration was due to the existence, at one corner, of a church (now demolished) that refused to be bought out, but did grant the use of the space above it. Construction of the building began in 1974 and was completed in 1977.