Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

Researchers Mark Prausnitz and Robyn Schlicher use a confocal microscope to study cells whose membranes have been opened by the application of ultrasound.

Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek

James M. Anderson’s default image

By: James M. Anderson

An ABC News/Washington Post survey in 2003 found that for the first time, 54 percent of Americans were dissatisfied with the overall quality of health care in the United States.

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

Research engineer Phil Santangelo works in professor Gang Bao’s cell culture facility in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University in Atlanta.

John Toon’s picture

By: John Toon

Georgia Tech professor Zhong Lin Wang holds a sample nanowire array that can be used to power nanometer scale devices.

Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek

T. J. Becker’s default image

By: T. J. Becker

In our increasingly wireless world, the air is chock-full of electromagnetic signals carrying data from one place to another. Yet, while new wireless technologies advance our options in security, commerce and entertainment, they also produce interference that may cause problems for people with implanted medical devices.

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

Georgia Tech postdoctoral fellow Jean-Francois Masson holds a microelectrode modified with a biosensing layer capable of measuring adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a chemical involved in energy transport in humans.

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

A worsening epidemic of sophisticated antimalarial drug counterfeiting in Southeast Asia and Africa is increasing the likelihood of drug-resistant parasites, which yield false-positive results on screening tests and risk the lives of hundreds of thousands of malaria patients—mostly children—researchers say.

Jane M. Sanders’s default image

By: Jane M. Sanders

A newly developed family of biodegradable polymers has shown potential for use in intracellular delivery and sustained release of therapeutic drugs to the acidic environments of tumors, inflammatory tissues and intracellular vesicles that hold foreign matter.

Tom Solon’s default image

By: Tom Solon

Advancements in diabetes treatments

Christopher Werner’s default image

By: Christopher Werner

Although conventional homogenization has served the needs of the dairy industry and other industries for more than a century, the producers of pharmaceutical, personal care, chemical and food products are increasingly turning to high-shear fluid processing when highly precise processing is required.

Syndicate content