William L. Roper’s default image

By: William L. Roper

A revolution is working its way through America’s health care systems. Like many great revolutions, it’s about empowerment and the creation of a new paradigm. It won’t happen overnight, but the forces at work are irresistible and will bring new hope and new responsibilities. The agent of change in this revolution is our long, national quest to improve the quality of health care.

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

ANSI/ASQ National Accreditation Board (ANAB) is developing an accreditation program for the recycling industry. The scheme, called the Recycling Industry Operations Standard (RIOS) is a comprehensive, integrated standard based on ISO 9001 and ISO 14001. It includes six components: general requirements, policy, planning, implementation, checking and corrective action, and management. It was developed by ANAB with the help of the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries Inc., a trade group that represents more than 1,200 recycling-industry professionals.

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

ANSI/ASQ National Accreditation Board (ANAB) is developing an accreditation program for the recycling industry. The scheme, called the Recycling Industry Operations Standard (RIOS) is a comprehensive, integrated standard based on ISO 9001 and ISO 14001. It includes six components: general requirements, policy, planning, implementation, checking and corrective action, and management.

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By: Tim Postema

The Dutch public health care system is being transformed in various ways. With an increasing focus on efficiency and consumer driven care, health institutions in The Netherlands are forced to critically evaluate their actions and processes. With recent political developments creating a more liberal health care system, the role of the patient is steadily changing to the one of a demanding consumer, taking more and more control of his or her own choice of care, all for the best price available.

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By: Marlo Brooke

The groundswell of radio frequency identification devices (RFID) in health care may be clouded by the stomping of Wal-Mart, but the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries are quietly becoming one of the top innovators and users of RFID, and they’ll likely outpace other market segments in the very near future. Stripped of its media hype, RFID is essentially a tracking device. One might wonder what the big deal is. With the never-ending effort of improving patient safety and cutting costs, health care is certainly well-aware of the need to track its every activity.

Thomas Erbach, Lisa Fan and Shari Kraber’s default image

By: Thomas Erbach, Lisa Fan and Shari Kraber

Optimizing biological assay conditions is a demanding process that scientists face every day. The requirement is to develop high-quality, robust assays that work across a wide range of biological conditions. The demand is to do this within a short development time frame. To overcome these obstacles, automated systems are often required to accommodate large numbers of samples. Setting up a model that systematically studies key experimental parameters, each across a defined range, is a challenge.

Laura Smith’s default image

By: Laura Smith

In hopes of cutting administrative costs and streamlining the amount of time it takes to get new drugs to consumers, eight global pharmaceutical manufacturers have formed a coalition, SAFE-BioPharma, to support the widespread adoption of the new global digital identity standard, Secure Access for Everyone (SAFE).As the biopharmaceutical industry has become more automated, it’s also become more collaborative.

BSI’s picture

By: BSI

Tamar June’s picture

By: Tamar June

If you are thinking of CFR 21 Part 11 compliance in terms of what the FDA may or may not require, you are missing a huge opportunity to make your business more efficient, nimble and ultimately profitable by improving the quality of your operation and its products. That’s the consensus of dozens of your competitors at FDA-regulated firms, industry consultants and even FDA agents.“Any electronic record system that can’t comply today should not be in service,” states John McKenney, SEC Associates’ president and CEO.

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