Christopher Werner’s default image

By: Christopher Werner

Although conventional homogenization has served the needs of the dairy industry and other industries for more than a century, the producers of pharmaceutical, personal care, chemical and food products are increasingly turning to high-shear fluid processing when highly precise processing is required. This special class of homogenization applies ultra-high shear force to a product stream to produce extremely small and uniformly sized particles and droplets for particle reduction, emulsification and cell disruption applications.

Jerry Fireman’s default image

By: Jerry Fireman

Diagnostic Hybrids Inc. manufactures discrete units of mammalian cell cultures and diagnostic reagents—such as antibodies—that are used to grow, isolate and type viruses. The company faced complex information-management challenges because of its many different product offerings, complex bills of material and high volume of units produced.

Brett Trusko, Ph.D. and H. James Harrington’s default image

By: Brett Trusko, Ph.D. and H. James Harrington

According to the Institute of Medicine, there are approximately 100,000 people per year killed in the Unites States because of medical errors. There are 100,000 families in despair because they have lost a loved one too soon. This also means that 100,000 medical professionals are losing sleep, worried about what they should have done differently, or whether they’ll be able to continue practicing medicine.

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

Avoiding blood trauma is a concern when pumping cardiac patients’ blood during surgery. With this in mind, a medical-device manufacturer decided to reuse the flow-path geometry of an existing arterial filter that had been proven safe and effective in many patients.

William L. Roper’s default image

By: William L. Roper

A revolution is working its way through America’s health care systems. Like many great revolutions, it’s about empowerment and the creation of a new paradigm. It won’t happen overnight, but the forces at work are irresistible and will bring new hope and new responsibilities. The agent of change in this revolution is our long, national quest to improve the quality of health care.

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

ANSI/ASQ National Accreditation Board (ANAB) is developing an accreditation program for the recycling industry. The scheme, called the Recycling Industry Operations Standard (RIOS) is a comprehensive, integrated standard based on ISO 9001 and ISO 14001. It includes six components: general requirements, policy, planning, implementation, checking and corrective action, and management. It was developed by ANAB with the help of the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries Inc., a trade group that represents more than 1,200 recycling-industry professionals.

Quality Digest’s picture

By: Quality Digest

ANSI/ASQ National Accreditation Board (ANAB) is developing an accreditation program for the recycling industry. The scheme, called the Recycling Industry Operations Standard (RIOS) is a comprehensive, integrated standard based on ISO 9001 and ISO 14001. It includes six components: general requirements, policy, planning, implementation, checking and corrective action, and management.

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By: Tim Postema

The Dutch public health care system is being transformed in various ways. With an increasing focus on efficiency and consumer driven care, health institutions in The Netherlands are forced to critically evaluate their actions and processes. With recent political developments creating a more liberal health care system, the role of the patient is steadily changing to the one of a demanding consumer, taking more and more control of his or her own choice of care, all for the best price available.

Marlo Brooke’s default image

By: Marlo Brooke

The groundswell of radio frequency identification devices (RFID) in health care may be clouded by the stomping of Wal-Mart, but the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries are quietly becoming one of the top innovators and users of RFID, and they’ll likely outpace other market segments in the very near future. Stripped of its media hype, RFID is essentially a tracking device. One might wonder what the big deal is. With the never-ending effort of improving patient safety and cutting costs, health care is certainly well-aware of the need to track its every activity.

Thomas Erbach, Lisa Fan and Shari Kraber’s default image

By: Thomas Erbach, Lisa Fan and Shari Kraber

Optimizing biological assay conditions is a demanding process that scientists face every day. The requirement is to develop high-quality, robust assays that work across a wide range of biological conditions. The demand is to do this within a short development time frame. To overcome these obstacles, automated systems are often required to accommodate large numbers of samples. Setting up a model that systematically studies key experimental parameters, each across a defined range, is a challenge.

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